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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in wheat stem sawfly Cephus cinctus and cross-species amplification in related species

Authors
item Hartel, K - NDSU
item Frederick, B - USDA/ARS/NPARL
item Shanower, Thomas

Submitted to: Molecular Ecology Notes
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2002
Publication Date: January 8, 2003
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/43926
Citation: Hartel, K.D., Frederick, B.A., Shanower, T.G. 2003. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in wheat stem sawfly Cephus cinctus and cross-species amplification in related species. Molecular Ecology Notes. 3(1): 85-87.

Interpretive Summary: The wheat stem sawfly is a key pest of wheat in the northern great plains. Among various management strategies, biological control could provide an environmentally sound and cost effective solution for wheat growers. To find appropriate and effective natural enemies it is important to understand the relationships among sawfly populations and related species. In this study five microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from the wheat stem sawfly genome. These markers can be used to compare populations within North America, and with related species from Asia and Europe. Understanding these relationships will assist biological control efforts by targeting related species and specific geographic regions for foreign exploration.

Technical Abstract: The wheat stem sawfly is an important insect pest of wheat that can cause significant damage to yield and grain quality. Five microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus, to facilitate future population genetic studies and help delineate their geographical origin. These loci were found to be polymorphic with an expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.304 to 0.937 and an observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.05 to 0.65. Successful cross-species amplification demonstrates the potential for these markers to provide a valuable tool for future population studies among related Cephus species.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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