Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetics of Winter Hardiness in 10 Lentil Recombinant Inbred Line Populations

Authors
item Kahraman, A. - WSU
item Kusmenoglu, I. - WSU
item Aydin, N. - WSU
item Aydogan, A. - WSU
item Erskine, W. - ICARDA
item Muehlbauer, Frederick

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 11, 2003
Publication Date: January 15, 2004
Citation: KAHRAMAN, A., KUSMENOGLU, I., AYDIN, N., AYDOGAN, A., ERSKINE, W., MUEHLBAUER, F.J. GENETICS OF WINTER HARDINESS IN 10 LENTIL RECOMBINANT INBRED LINE POPULATIONS. CROP SCIENCE. 2004. v. 44. p. 5-12.

Interpretive Summary: A critical component of a program designed to genetically improve the lentil crop is knowledge of the genetics of winter hardiness. In this study we used a series of 10 lentil crosses and studied the segregation patterns of the progenies. Winter hardiness in lentil was determined to be a quantitatively inherited trait and that to improve the trait it is necessary to accumulate the genes in a directed program of evaluation and selection. The information will form the basis of a subsequent study to map and tag the genes in the lentil genome to identify markers that can be used in breeding programs. The information gained in this research explains the quantitative nature of winter hardiness in lentil that will have to be taken into account in the selection of potential new varieties. Markers for the genes will enable an accelerated program for winter hardiness in lentil. Germplasm developed will enable lentil to be fall sown and benefit from crop development in a cooler more humid part of the growing season thus improving crop yields.

Technical Abstract: Available winter hardy lentil germplasm has prompted interest in the development and use of cultivars that can be fall planted in cold highland areas. This change in production of lentil from normally spring sown to fall sown increases yield potential. Understanding the mode of inheritance of winter hardiness in lentil would assist breeding efforts. In this study, we used 10 F6 derived recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations from crosses of winter hardy germplasm lines with winter susceptible germplasm. The RILs were planted in a randomized complete block design with three replications at Haymana, and Sivas, Turkey and at Pullman Washington, U.S.A. between 1997 and 2001. Meaningful data for an analysis of the inheritance of winter hardiness were available only at Haymana in 1997-98 and at Pullman in 1998-99, indicating infrequent occurrences of sufficiently cold winters to provide differential killing. Percent survival was calculated based on plant stand counts recorded after establishment in the fall and regrowth in the spring. Parental line WA8649041 was the most winter hardy followed by WA8649090, ILL-1878 and ILL-669. General combining ability and specific combining ability effects were significant at both locations. Heritability estimates among the 10 RIL populations ranged from 15.9 to 90.7%. Inheritance patterns appeared to be quantitative based on frequency distributions. No discrete segregation was evident for winter hardiness. Since winter hardiness in lentil appears to be a quantitative trait, accumulation of genes responsible for winter survival will likely require stringent field testing or marker assisted selection.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page