Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Monoclonal Antibody Specific to Glassywinged Sharpshooter Egg Protein: a Tool for Predator Gut Analysis and Early Detection of Pest Infestation

Authors
item Hagler, James
item Daane, Kent - UC, BERKELEY, CA
item Costa, Heather - UC, RIVERSIDE, CA

Submitted to: CDFA Pierce's Disease Control Program Research Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2002
Publication Date: December 15, 2002
Citation: HAGLER, J.R., DAANE, K., COSTA, H. A MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY SPECIFIC TO GLASSYWINGED SHARPSHOOTER EGG PROTEIN: A TOOL FOR PREDATOR GUT ANALYSIS AND EARLY DETECTION OF PEST INFESTATION. CDFA PIERCE'S DISEASE CONTROL PROGRAM RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM. 2002. pp. 79-80

Technical Abstract: Effective control of glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca coagulata, will require an integrated pest management approach. A major component of true integrated pest management is the exploitation of the pest's natural enemies, which, when utilized to their greatest potential, can increase the effectiveness of other control tactics. Very little information exists on GWSS natural enemies. This is especially true for their predaceous natural enemies. Evidence of predation of GWSS eggs has been observed in the field; however, the composition of the .predator complex, and the relative impact of each predator on GWSS mortality are unknown. In the past, we have developed a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the egg stage of Lygus hesperus, Pectinophora gossypiella, and Bemisia argentifolii for use in studying predation in the field. MAbs provide an avenue to qualitatively assess the impact of predator species on populations of key insect pests; provide a quick, efficient, and cost effective technique for screening numerous predators in a conservation biological control program and provide a method to compare the efficacy of in vitro-reared predators with that of their wild counterparts in an augmentative biological control program. Attempts to monitor GWSS populations and their natural enemies in Southern California are complicated by the presence of a native species of sharpshooter, the smoke tree sharpshooter, Homalodisca lacerta. The eggs of this species are virtually indistinguishable from those of H coagulata with the naked eye. Thus it is difficult to separate the relative rates of predation and parasitism of GWSS and smoke tree sharpshooter in areas where these two species overlap. The similarity also prohibits positive identification of GWSS eggs intercepted during quarantine inspections of plant shipments. A pest-specific MAb can be used to accurately identify pests that are difficult to differentiate by the naked eye. A MAb specific to GWSS egg would be an invaluable tool for early monitoring of pest infestation and decision-making in pesticide application.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page