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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Corn Growth and Leaf Hyperspectral Reflectance Properties As Affected by Nitrogen Deficiency

Authors
item Reddy, K - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Zhao, Duli - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Kakani, Gopal - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Read, John

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 10, 2002
Publication Date: November 11, 2002
Citation: Reddy, K.J., Zhao, D., Kakani, G., Read, J.J. 2002. Corn growth and leaf hyperspectral reflectance properties as affected by nitrogen deficiency [abstract]. Agronomy Abstracts. CD-ROM.

Interpretive Summary: None required.

Technical Abstract: Experiments were conducted in ten sunlit, temperature- and humidity- controlled growth chambers in 2001 growing season to determine the effects of nitrogen (N) nutrition on corn (Zea mays L. cv 33A14) growth and leaf hyperspectral reflectance properties. We decreased N supply in the irrigation water at different days after plant emergence (DAE) to simulate low fertility conditions; otherwise, environmental conditions were favorable for plant growth. The four N treatments were 1) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution throughout the experiment (control); 2) 20% of the control N starting 15 days after emergence, DAE (20% N); 3) N withheld starting 15 DAE (0% N); and 4) N withheld from the nutrient solution starting 23 DAE (0% NL). Under these treatments, the concentration of N in fully expanded uppermost leaves ranged between 1.1% and 4.8% across all sampling dates. Nitrogen deficiency significantly decreased plant growth rate and leaf photosynthesis except for the 0% NL treatment. At final harvest, the plant height, leaf area and shoot biomass were only about 64-66% of the control for 20% N treatment, and 46-56% of the control for 0% N treatment. Nitrogen deficiency treatments of 20% N and 0% N could be discriminated by using leaf spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared ranges (400-800 nm) at 7 days after treatments were commenced. This paper also will discuss relationships obtained between changes in leaf reflectance and the concentration of N, chlorophyll or total phenolics in mature corn leaves.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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