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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Extension Program Impact on New Jersey Equine Pasture Managers

Authors
item Kluchinski, D - RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
item Singer, Jeremy
item Bamka, W - RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 14, 2002
Publication Date: November 14, 2002
Citation: KLUCHINSKI, D., SINGER, J.W., BAMKA, W.J. EXTENSION PROGRAM IMPACT ON NEW JERSEY EQUINE PASTURE MANAGERS. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY MEETINGS. 2002. CD-ROM. MADISON, WI.

Technical Abstract: A survey of New Jersey equine pasture owners was conducted in January 2000 to determine pasture management practices. Selected variables were analyzed (SAS© LOGIT regression model) and the maximum likelihood estimation method used to estimate the effectiveness of Rutgers Cooperative Extension pasture management programs. Managers with 21 to 35 animals and 8.5 to 16 ha of pasture are 19% and 15% more likely to utilize Extension. Larger properties with more animals require more complex management that fosters greater interaction with Extension. Enhanced pasture management requires capital expenditures. Consequently, property owners that spend more than $49 ha**-1 year**-1 are 12% more likely to obtain information from Extension. Those who do not use sound management practices are less likely to interact with Extension. Survey respondents that have never soil tested are 30% less likely, while those that apply limestone annually are 27% less likely to obtain information from Extension. The results suggest that educational programs should target smaller property owners and focus on liming and pH management, rotational grazing, and manure testing for soil nutrient management because the survey indicated these practices are under or improperly utilized.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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