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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Rotation and Tillage Effects on Corn and Soybean Yield As Affected by Rainfall Distribution

Authors
item Wortmann, Charles - UNIV OF NE/LINCOLN
item Wilhelm, Wallace

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 30, 2002
Publication Date: November 1, 2002
Citation: Wortmann, C., Wilhelm, W.W. 2002. Rotation and tillage effects on corn and soybean yield as affected by rainfall distribution. Agronomy Abstracts #092155.

Interpretive Summary: Year-to-year variation in crop yield response to tillage (plow, disk, chisel, subsoil, ridge-till, and no-till) and rotation (continuous corn, continuous soybean, and corn-soybean rotation) were evaluated over a 15-year period in southeastern Nebraska. Yield of corn and soybean was less in years with high summer temperatures. Soybean yield, but not corn, was greater with more summer rainfall. Generally, tillage did not affect crop yield, except that corn yield was less with no-till than with plow tillage. The tillage by year interaction effect was significant for both crops and with the yield advantage for the plow treatment minimized in years with warm spring temperatures. Corn yields, regressed on an environmental index (yearly mean yield), were most stable for chisel tillage, while deviations from regression were greatest for no-till and plow tillage treatments. Yields were greater with rotated compare with mono-crop for corn (7.10 vs. 5.83 Mg/ha) and soybean (2.57 vs. 2.35 Mg/ha). The rotation benefit to corn yield was greatest with lower spring temperature, greater spring rainfall, and higher summer temperature. Variation in the rotation effect on soybean yield was independent of weather properties. Spring weather conditions accounted for more variation in the tillage and rotation effects than did summer weather.

Technical Abstract: Year-to-year variation in crop yield response to tillage (plow, disk, chisel, subsoil, ridge-till, and no-till) and rotation (continuous corn, continuous soybean, and corn-soybean rotation) were evaluated over a 15-year period in southeastern Nebraska. Yield of corn and soybean was less in years with high summer temperatures. Soybean yield, but not corn, was greater with more summer rainfall. Generally, tillage did not affect crop yield, except that corn yield was less with no-till than with plow tillage. The tillage by year interaction effect was significant for both crops and with the yield advantage for the plow treatment minimized in years with warm spring temperatures. Corn yields, regressed on an environmental index (yearly mean yield), were most stable for chisel tillage, while deviations from regression were greatest for no-till and plow tillage treatments. Yields were greater with rotated compare with mono-crop for corn (7.10 vs. 5.83 Mg/ha) and soybean (2.57 vs. 2.35 Mg/ha). The rotation benefit to corn yield was greatest with lower spring temperature, greater spring rainfall, and higher summer temperature. Variation in the rotation effect on soybean yield was independent of weather properties. Spring weather conditions accounted for more variation in the tillage and rotation effects than did summer weather.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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