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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of the High Oleic Trait on Roasted Peanut Flavor in Backcross-Derived Breeding Lines

Authors
item Pattee, Harold
item Isleib, Thomas - NC STATE UNIVERSITY
item Gorbet, Daniel - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Moore, Kim - AGRATECH SEED INC
item Lopez, Yolanda - TEXAS AGRIC EXP STATION
item Baring, Michael - TEXAS AGRIC EXP STATION
item Simpson, Charles - TEXAS AGRIC EXP STATION

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 9, 2002
Publication Date: December 18, 2002
Citation: PATTEE, H.E., ISLEIB, T.G., GORBET, D.W., MOORE, K.M., LOPEZ, Y., BARING, M.R., SIMPSON, C.E. EFFECT OF THE HIGH OLEIC TRAIT ON ROASTED PEANUT FLAVOR IN BACKCROSS-DERIVED BREEDING LINES. JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY. 2002. V. 50. P. 7362-7365.

Interpretive Summary: The high-oleic trait in peanut is a desirable new variety trait because it provides greater oxidative stability in products. We have observed that the high-oleic trait may positively influence the transfer of roasted flavor characteristics into new peanut varieties. We used 7 pairs of peanut lines, each pair composed of a variety and a high-oleic line developed by transferring the high-oleic trait into the variety to further study this gene action effect. The high-oleic trait does appear to have a generally beneficial effect on peanut flavor. Because there is some variability in how much effect there is, it will be important to test the flavor of new high-oleic releases.

Technical Abstract: The high-oleic trait of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) has been suggested to have a positive impact on roasted peanut sensory attribute. A series of lines derived by backcrossing the high-oleic trait into several existing cultivars were compared with their parent cultivars at locations in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas. The test included normal- and high-oleic variants of F435, GK 7, NC 7, NC 9, Sunrunner, Tamrun 96, and Tamspan 90. SMK samples were roasted, ground into paste and evaluated by a sensory panel. Background genotype had an effect (P<0.01) on the heritable sensory attributes roasted peanut, sweet, and bitter. Oleate level had a positive effect on roasted peanut intensity, increasing it by 0.3 flavor intensity units (fiu) averaged across all backgrounds. However, the magnitude of improvement varied across backgrounds. The high-oleic trait had no effect or increased the intensity of roasted peanut attribute in each background. The increase was greatest in Tamrun 96 (+0.6 fiu) and spanish genotypes Tamspan 90 (+0.4 fiu) and F435 (+0.4 fiu). A change of 0.5 fiu or more should be perceptible to consumers. Interaction between oleate level and background genotype was detected for sweet and bitter attributes. The trait had an increasing effect on the bitter attribute only in the background of Tamspan 90 (+0.7 fiu). Incorporation of the high-oleic trait into peanut cultivars is likely to improve the intensity of roasted peanut attribute, but it may also increase the bitter attribute in spanish genotypes.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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