Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of the High-Oleic Trait and Paste Storage Variables on Sensory Attribute Stability of Roasted Peanuts

Authors
item Pattee, Harold
item Isleib, Thomas - NC STATE UNIVERSITY
item Moore, Kim - AGRATECH SEEDS INC.
item Gorbet, Daniel - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Giesbrecht, Francis - NC STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 9, 2002
Publication Date: December 18, 2002
Citation: PATTEE, H.E., ISLEIB, T.G., MOORE, K.M., GORBET, D.W., GIESBRECHT, F.G. EFFECT OF THE HIGH-OLEIC TRAIT AND PASTE STORAGE VARIABLES ON SENSORY ATTRIBUTE STABILITY OF ROASTED PEANUTS. JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY. 2002. V. 50. P. 7366-7370.

Interpretive Summary: The peanut industry is interested in the high-oleic acid trait of peanuts because it provides greater oxidative stability in products. We have observed that the high-oleic trait may positively influence the transfer of roasted flavor characteristics into new peanut varieties. This observation may also be an artifact of handling procedures. By examining various variations in the handling procedures it has been determined that the observation is not an artifact but a gene interaction not fully understood.

Technical Abstract: There has been much interest in the effect of the high-oleic acid trait of peanuts on various quality factors since discovery of high levels of oleic acid in a peanut mutant genotype. The trait provides greater oxidative stability for the high-oleic oil and seed. Several research groups have investigated high-oleic peanut oil and roasted peanut flavor characteristics, which were similar within high-oleic lines compared to Florunner. It was observed that some high-oleic lines derived from the Sunrunner cultivar have consistently higher predicted breeding values for roasted peanut attribute than Sunrunner itself. This study investigated if this apparent effect of the trait was an artifact arising from the handling procedures during processing and storage, or from flavor fade. High-oleic lines were derived by backcrossing the trait into existing cultivars, and the comparison of sensory attribute intensity was with the recurrent parent used in backcrossing. Previous comparisons have been between lines differing in more than just oleate content, i.e., with widely different background genotypes that could contribute to the differences observed. We found differential rates of change in sensory attributes in different background genotypes, suggesting that the comparison of high- and normal-oleic lines should be made in common background genotypes as well as in common production and post-harvest environments. Regarding whether intensity loss of roasted peanut attribute during storage at 20° C might be a factor contributing to variation attributed to other factors in sensory panel evaluations conducted over a period of several weeks, there was no measurable change in roasted peanut attribute in samples stored at 20° C over the 63 d duration of this experiment. There were changes in roasted peanut in samples stored at 22° C, confirming that storage at 20° C is sufficient for large studies that require multiple sensory panel sessions over a period of weeks.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page