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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: EFFECTS OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT ON CHLOROPHYLL CONCENTRATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR TMDL CRITERIA

Authors
item Knight, Scott
item Cooper, Charles

Submitted to: Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2002
Publication Date: November 1, 2002
Citation: KNIGHT, S.S., COOPER, C.M. EFFECTS OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENT ON CHLOROPHYLL CONCENTRATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR TMDL CRITERIA. SOCIETY OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTS. 2002. p. 6.

Technical Abstract: Traditional agricultural practices often result in soil erosion that can lead to increased turbidity in oxbow lakes and subsequent reduced productivity. Suspended sediment has been identified as a primary cause of low productivity due to its interference with photosynthesis in phytoplankton. Consequently, oxbow lake popularity as recreational resources has decreased as water quality and fisheries have declined. Turbidity problems in oxbow lakes can be persistent throughout the year in areas having soils with high clay content. Although nutrients such as phosphorus are typically associated with alluvial soils and tend to load in oxbow lakes, these systems may become energy starved and very unproductive due to lack of light penetration. In order to establish reasonable Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for these types of systems, critical concentrations of total or suspended sediments, necessary to elicit a corresponding increase in chlorophyll, must be established. Two oxbow lake water quality studies support a relationship between suspended sediment and suggest critical concentrations for suspended sediments may be established. This research examines the relationship between suspended sediments, chlorophyll, and lake ecology and suggests a possible critical concentration target for suspended sediment TMDLs.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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