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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Acquired Freezing Tolerance in Higher Plants: the Sensing and Molecular Responses to Low Nonfreezing Temperatures

Author
item Xin, Zhanguo

Submitted to: Cell and Molecular Responses to Stress
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2002
Publication Date: December 20, 2002
Citation: XIN, Z. ACQUIRED FREEZING TOLERANCE IN HIGHER PLANTS: THE SENSING AND MOLECULAR RESPONSES TO LOW NONFREEZING TEMPERATURES. Cell and Molecular Responses to Stress. 2002. p. 121-137.

Interpretive Summary: This book chapter discussed signal transduction related to the development of freezing tolerance in plants during cold acclimation. It presented the evidence that cold acclimation in plants is controlled by multiple pathways. Understanding of different pathways by which plants increase their freezing tolerance is essential to design effective combinatorial approaches to reduce freezing injury.

Technical Abstract: Temperate plants develop a greater ability to withstand freezing in response to a period of low but nonfreezing temperatures through a complex adaptive process of cold acclimation. Exciting progresses have been made in the recent years to understanding this complex processes. This review summarized and integrated the recent research development in this field. The transcription factor, CBFs, have emerged as a major pathway mediating cold acclimation in higher plants. This review presented comprehensive evidence that cold acclimation are controlled by multiple signaling pathways in addition to that controlled by CBFs. Further, this review outlined the major challenges in cold acclimation research.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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