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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Phosphorus and Nitrogen-Based Beef Cattle Feedlot Manure Or Compost Application to Corn

Author
item Eghball, Bahman

Submitted to: Nebraska Beef Reports
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2000
Publication Date: January 1, 2001
Citation: EGHBALL, B. PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN-BASED BEEF CATTLE FEEDLOT MANURE OR COMPOST APPLICATION TO CORN. 2001 NEBRASKA BEEF REPORTS. pp. 89-91. 2001.

Interpretive Summary: This study was conducted to evaluate effects of P and N-based manure and compost applications on corn yield and soil P level. Annual or biennial manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those with chemical fertilizer application. P-based manure or compost application resulted in similar corn grain yield but significantly less soil P build-up than N-based treatments. Estimated N availability was 40% for manure and 15% for compost in the first year and was 18% for manure and 8% for compost in the second year after application. Surface soil levels of total carbon, total N, nitrate, pH, and electrical conductivity were increased significantly following four year of manure or compost application. The changes in soil properties were greater for N than P-based applications.

Technical Abstract: This study was conducted to evaluate effects of P and N-based manure and compost applications on corn yield and soil P level. Annual or biennial manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those with chemical fertilizer application. P-based manure or compost application resulted in similar corn grain yield but significantly less soil P build-up than N-based treatments. Estimated N availability was 40% for manure and 15% for compost in the first year and was 18% for manure and 8% for compost in the second year after application. Surface soil levels of total carbon, total N, nitrate, pH, and electrical conductivity were increased significantly following four year of manure or compost application. The changes in soil properties were greater for N than P-based applications.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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