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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nitrogen and Phosphorus Based Beef Cattle Feedlot Manure Or Compost Application: Soil Properties

Author
item Eghball, Bahman

Submitted to: Proceedings Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2000
Publication Date: March 20, 2000
Citation: EGHBALL, B. NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BASED BEEF CATTLE FEEDLOT MANURE OR COMPOST APPLICATION: SOIL PROPERTIES. PROCEEDINGS GREAT PLAINS SOIL FERTILITY CONFERENCE. P 127-134. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Manure or compost application based on nitrogen (N) needs of corn may result in soil accumulation of phosphorus (P) since the manure or compost N:P ratio is usually smaller than the corn N:P uptake ratio. This study was conducted from 1992 to 1996 to evaluate the effects of N and P-based manure and compost applications on soil properties. Annual or biennial applications of composted and non-composted beef cattle feedlot manure were made to supply N or P needs of corn. Phosphorus-based manure or compost treatments also received additional fertilizer N as needed. Fertilized and unfertilized checks were also included. Phosphorus movement to the soil depth increment of 12 to 24 in was observed with four years of manure or compost application. N-based manure and compost application resulted in significantly greater surface soil (0-6 in) P levels than P-based. Soil pH increased with manure and compost applications but decreased with ammonium-N fertilizer application. After four years of manure and compost application, soil surface (0-6 in) carbon and N were greater for N-based than P-based reflecting the differences in application rates. Soil nitrate was similar for all treatments in 1994 (the year with the highest yield), but fertilizer application resulted in more soil nitrate than other treatments in 1995 and 1996, both drier than 1994. N-based manure and compost applications resulted in greater soil electrical conductivity than P-based indicating accumulation of some salts in the N-based treated soil. Soil property changes were greater for N than P-based manure and compost applications.

Technical Abstract: Manure or compost application based on nitrogen (N) needs of corn may result in soil accumulation of phosphorus (P), N, other ions, and salt since the manure or compost N:P ratio is usually smaller than the corn N:P uptake ratio. This study was conducted from 1992 to 1996 to evaluate the effects of N and P-based manure and compost applications on soil properties. Composted and non-composted beef cattle feedlot manure were applied to supply N or P needs of corn for either a one or two-yr period. Phosphorus-based manure or compost treatments also received additional fertilizer N as needed. Fertilized and unfertilized checks were also included. Phosphorus movement to the soil depth increment of 30 to 60 cm was observed with 4 yr of manure or compost application. N-based manure and compost application resulted in significantly greater surface soil (0-15 cm) P levels than P-based. Soil pH increased with manure and compost but decreased with NH4NO3 application. Soil bulk density was unaffected by manure or compost application. After 4 years of manure and compost application, soil surface (0-15 cm) C and N were greater for N-based than P-based reflecting the differences in application rates. Soil nitrate was similar for all treatments in 1994 (the year with the highest yield), but fertilizer application resulted in more soil NO3-N than other treatments in 1995 and 1996, both drier than 1994. N-based manure and compost applications resulted in greater soil EC than P-based. Soil property changes were greater for N than P-based manure and compost applications.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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