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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of Insecticide Resistance by the Beneficial Pentatomid Predator, the Spined Soldier Bug, Podisus Maculiventris

Author
item Shelby, Kent

Submitted to: Annual Meeting Central States Entomological Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 6, 2002
Publication Date: April 6, 2002
Citation: SHELBY, K. DEVELOPMENT OF INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE BY THE BENEFICIAL PENTATOMID PREDATOR, THE SPINED SOLDIER BUG, PODISUS MACULIVENTRIS. ANNUAL MEETING CENTRAL STATES ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 2002. Abstract #D0582

Technical Abstract: The effectiveness of mass-reared predatory insects may be limited by insecticides to which they are exposed in the field, and to which they may or may not have evolved resistance. Inundative release of mass-reared pentatomid predators, such as the spined soldier bug, in biocontrol programs may be severely compromised by the use of incompatible insecticides. Exposure to insecticides may naturally select some predators for resistance to commonly applied pesticide chemistries. We have evaluated this hypothesis using the spined soldier bug. Development of insecticide resistance by nymphs collected from alfalfa fields in Boone Co., Missouri was assessed in the laboratory by selection at the LD85 level over several generations. Spined soldier bugs exhibited high, pre-existing resistance to several of the newer biorational insecticides, methoxyfenozide, tebufenozide, spinosad and indoxacarb. However, animals showed extreme sensitivity to imidacloprid, fipronil, and cyfluthrin. After eight generations of selection on imidacloprid the resistance to this chemical increased 500 fold. Selection with fipronil over seven generations, however, resulted in only a 2-fold increase in resistance, indicating that the potential for development of resistance to this insecticide may be lower than for imidacloprid. The potential for development of resistance by the spined soldier bug to additional commonly used insecticides will be evaluated in future tests.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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