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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Rainfall Simulator Study of Agro-Chemicals Transport in Soils from Farmlands Near the Everglades National Park, Florida, Usa.

Authors
item Savabi, M
item Shinde, D - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Norton, Lloyd
item Szulczewski, M - UNIV. OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: International Soil Conservation Organization Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 26, 2002
Publication Date: May 26, 2002
Citation: Savabi, M.R., Shinde, D., Norton, L.D., Szulczewski, M. 2002. Rainfall Simulator Study of Agro-Chemicals Transport in Soils from Farmlands Near the Everglades National Park, Florida, USA.. International Soil Conservation Organization Conference Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: Agro-chemical loading from agricultural and urban areas has increased nutrient concentrations, particularly phosphorus, in the Everglades National Park. The location of three national parks (Everglades, Biscayne and Big Cypress) in South Florida poses a major challenge for agriculture sector to develop satisfatory techniques that optimize crop production along with environmental protection. Soils in South Florida overlay a porous limestone bedrock and the shallow, unconfined Biscayne aquifer. The soils have low water holding capacity and high permeability and when large amounts of water and fertilizers are applied to crops there is a potential danger of agrochemicals (nutrients and pesticides) leaching into the Biscayne aquifer. This study quantively evaluate the movement of agro-chemicals in various soil types in South Florida.

Technical Abstract: Non-point source water pollutants from agricultural areas have been implicated as a source of water quality degradation in South Florida. Nutrient loading from agricultural and urban areas has increased nutrient concentrations, particularly phosphorus, in the Everglades National Park. This could have an adverse affect on natural vegetation types and paterns. The objective of the study was to investigate wash-off phosphorus in the soils from South Florida under simulated rainfall. Three typical soils, covering about 85% of the region, were selected for this study. A rainfall simulator was used to simulate regional rainfall characteristics. The results indicate that phosphorus transport from the soil depens not only adsorption coefficient but on the soil erodibility and permeability.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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