Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service Research on Improving Host-Plant Resistance to Pests

Authors
item Lynch, Robert
item Guo, Baozhu
item Timper, Patricia
item Wilson, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 16, 2002
Publication Date: May 27, 2003
Citation: Lynch, R.E., Guo, B., Timper, P., Wilson, J.P. 2003. United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service on improving host-plant resistance to pests. Pest Management Science. 59:718-727.

Interpretive Summary: Host-plant resistance is an efficient, economical, and environmentally benign approach used to manage many pests and diseases of agricultural crops. Scientists screen germplasm of a particular plant species collected around the world to find resistance to a particular plant disease, nematode or insect that is an economic pest on the crop. They then incorporate the resistance into elite breeding lines that can be used to breed commercial varieties with resistance to the particular pest(s). After nearly a century of research, the resources and tools have become more refined, but the basic tasks in breeding for resistance have not changed. In some instances, genetic engineering has expedited this process through incorporating a foreign gene(s) for resistance into elite germplasm. ARS has made significant contributions in the development of germplasm with resistance to insects, nematodes, and plant diseases. Because resistant plant varieties are an essential component of sustainable production systems, ARS is committed to developing techniques and germplasm to meet this goal.

Technical Abstract: Host-plant resistance is an efficient, economical, and environmentally benign approach used to manage many pests and diseases of agricultural crops. After nearly a century of research, the resources and tools have become more refined but the basic tasks in breeding for resistance have not changed. Resistance must be identified, incorporated into elite germplasm, and deployed in a form useful to growers. In some instances, biotechnology has expedited this process through incorporating a foreign gene(s) for resistance into elite germplasm. ARS has made significant contributions in the development of germplasm with resistance to insects, nematodes, and plant diseases. Because resistant plant varieties are an essential component of sustainable production systems, ARS is committed to developing techniques and germplasm to meet this goal.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page