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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Controlling Texas Panicum in Strip-Tillage Peanut Production

Authors
item Johnson, Wiley
item Prostko, Eric - UNIV. OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: Georgia Peanut Research Extension Report
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: October 27, 2002
Publication Date: November 19, 2002
Citation: Johnson, W.C., Prostko, E.P. 2002. Controlling Texas panicum in strip-tillage peanut production. University of Georgia Peanut Research and Extension Report. p. 126-131.

Interpretive Summary: Strip-tillage peanut production is quickly being adopted by growers in the southeastern U.S. One of the challenges of strip-tillage peanut production is Texas panicum control. Texas panicum is one of the most common weeds of peanut in the southeastern U.S. and is very competitive. Studies were conducted from 1999 to 2001 in Georgia to develop Texas panicum management systems in strip-tillage peanut production into a killed rye cover crop. Preemergence (PRE) herbicides were evaluated for Texas panicum control; ethalfluralin, pendimethalin, metolachlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, and a nontreated PRE control. All plots were irrigated immediately after PRE applications to activate herbicides. These trials also included postemergence (POST) graminicides applied 28 days after peanut emergence; sethoxydim, clethodim, and a nontreated POST control. None of the PRE herbicides alone adequately controlled Texas panicum in strip-till peanut production, even with optimum activation with irrigation. Both sethoxydim and clethodim consistently controlled Texas panicum, regardless of PRE treatments. While POST graminicides effectively controlled Texas panicum in strip-till peanut production, their use to the exclusion of PRE herbicides could leave small-seeded dicot weeds uncontrolled. Growers who choose to use irrigated strip-till peanut production must plan to use a properly timed POST graminicide for Texas panicum control in addition to traditional dinitroaniline herbicides. Peanut growers need to be mindful of this additional cost when making decisions on tillage systems and it needs to be factored into peanut production budgets.

Technical Abstract: Texas panicum is difficult to control in strip-tillage peanut production. Studies were conducted from 1999 to 2001 in Georgia to develop Texas panicum management systems in strip-tillage peanut production. The experimental design was a split-plot with four replications. Main plots were preemergence (PRE) herbicides for annual grass control; ethalfluralin (0.8 kg ai/ha), pendimethalin (1.1 kg ai/ha), metolachlor (2.2 kg ai/ha), alachlor (3.4 kg ai/ha), dimethenamid (1.3 kg ai/ha), and a nontreated PRE control. All plots were irrigated immediately after PRE applications to activate herbicides. Sub-plots were postemergence (POST) graminicides applied 28 days after peanut emergence; sethoxydim (0.22 kg ai/ha), clethodim (0.10 kg ai/ha), and a nontreated POST control. POST graminicides were applied with a crop oil concentrate at 1.0% by vol. None of the PRE herbicides alone adequately controlled Texas panicum in strip-till peanut production, even with optimum activation with irrigation. Both sethoxydim and clethodim consistently controlled Texas panicum, regardless of PRE treatments. While POST graminicides effectively controlled Texas panicum in strip-till peanut production, their use to the exclusion of PRE herbicides could leave small-seeded dicot weeds uncontrolled. Growers who choose to use irrigated strip-till peanut production must plan to use a properly timed POST graminicide for Texas panicum control in addition to traditional dinitroaniline herbicides. This additional cost needs to be factored into crop production budgets.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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