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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Trap Response of Michigan Social Wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) to the Feeding Attractants Acetic Acid, Isobutanol, and Heptyl Butyrate

Authors
item Reed, H. C. - ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY
item Landolt, Peter
item Ellis, D. J. - ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Great Lakes Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2002
Publication Date: February 1, 2003
Citation: Reed, H., Landolt, P.J., Ellis, D. 2003. Trap response of Michigan social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) to the feeding attractants acetic acid, isobutanol, and heptyl butyrate. Great Lakes Entomologist. 35:71-78.

Interpretive Summary: Because of concerns with adverse environmental and human health effects of many pesticides in use for controlling insects, new methods are needed to control insect pests of agricultural crops. Natural chemical attractants for insect pests are useful for trapping and killing targeted species. Researchers at the USDA- ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory are developing chemical attractants for several insect pests of tree fruits, including yellowjackets and paper wasps that are pests in apple and pear orchards as well as vineyards. It was determined in collaborative studies with other researchers at Oral Roberts University that nine different species of these social wasps can be trapped with two different types of chemical attractants and that the wasps that are related taxonomically respond similarly to the chemical attractants. This new information is helpful to efforts to manage particular species that are pests, by indicating which lures should be used for different types of wasps.

Technical Abstract: Nine Species of social wasps were captured in traps baited with acetic acid, isobutanol, heptyl butyrate and combinations of acetic acid and either isobutanol or heptyl butrate. Three yellowjacket species in the Vespula rufa species group were captured in traps (Vespula acadica (Sladen), Vespula consobrina (Saussure), Vespula vidua (Saussure)). They responded similarly, with attraction only to heptyl butyrate. Three yellowjacket species in the Vespula vulgaris species group were also captured in traps (Vespula vulgaris (L.), Vespula flavopilosa Jacobson, Vespula maculifrons (Buyyson)). They responded similarly, with attraction primarily to the combination of acetic acid and isobutanol. The bald-faced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata (L.) was attracted to acetic acid and was more strongly attracted to the combination of acetic acid and isobutanol. The aerial yellowjacket, Dolichovespula arenaria (Fabr.), was also attracted to acetic acid and to isobutanol, and was more strongly attracted to the combination of acetic acid and isobutanol. These results add to our understanding of how to target various species of social wasps with chemical lures.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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