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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effectiveness of the USDA 5-Step Multiple-Pass Method to Assess Food Intakein Obese and Non-Obese Women.

Authors
item Conway, Joan
item Ingwersen, Linda
item Vinyard, Bryan
item Moshfegh, Alanna

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 23, 2002
Publication Date: April 1, 2003
Citation: Conway, J.M., Ingwersen, L.A., Moshfegh, A.J. 2003. Effectiveness of the usda 5-step multiple-pass method to assess food intake in obese and non-obese women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 77:1171-1178.

Interpretive Summary: National surveys of food intake rely on the 24-hour recall method for assessing nutrient intake of the American population. This observational validation study was conducted to test the effectiveness of the USDA 5- Step Multiple-Pass Method for dietary recall and to test the ability of obese and non-obese women to recall food intake. Forty-nine women between the ages of 21 and 65y selected all meals and snacks, during one day, from a wide variety of foods. A dietary recall using the USDA Multiple Pass Method was administered by telephone the following day, using the USDA Food Model Booklet for portion size estimation. USDA's Survey Nutrient Database was used to calculate actual food consumption. Women were grouped by body mass index (Group I less than 25.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=14), Group II greater than 25.0 kilograms per meter squared less than 30.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=15), Group III greater than 30.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=20)) for data analysis. As a whole the study population overestimated the intakes of energy (E), protein (PRO), carbohydrate (CHO), and fat (FAT) by 7 9%. In the obese women (Group III)there were no significant differences between mean recalled and actual intakes for E, PRO, CHO, and FAT, whereas normal weight and overweight women significantly overestimated E (11-12%), PRO (12-14%), and CHO (11- 12%) intakes. The USDA 5-Step Multiple Pass Method was used effectively to assess the food intake within 10% of actual intake. Obese women more accurately recalled E, PRO, and CHO intake than did overweight and normal weight women. These findings support the use of this method by USDA to conduct national surveys of food intake and therefore they have significance to other federal agencies and the food industry.

Technical Abstract: National surveys of food intake rely on the 24-hour recall method for assessing nutrient intake of the American population. This observational validation study was conducted under controlled conditions to test the effectiveness of the USDA 5-Step Multiple-Pass Method for dietary recall and to test the ability of obese and non-obese women to recall food intake. Forty-nine women between the ages of 21 and 65y selected all meals and snacks, during one day, from a wide variety of foods. A dietary recall using the USDA Multiple Pass Method was administered by telephone the following day, using the USDA Food Model Booklet for portion size estimation. USDA's Survey Nutrient Database was used to calculate actual food consumption. Women were grouped by body mass index (Group I less than 25.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=14), Group II greater than 25.0 kilograms per meter squared less than 30.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=15), Group III greater than 30.0 kilograms per meter squared (n=20)) for data analysis. As a whole the study population overestimated the intakes of energy (E), protein (PRO), carbohydrate (CHO), and fat (FAT) by 7 9%. In the obese group of women there were no significant differences between mean recalled and actual intakes for any of the macronutrients, whereas normal weight and overweight women significantly overestimated E (11-12%), PRO (12-14%), and CHO (11-12%) intakes. The USDA 5-Step Multiple Pass Method was used effectively to assess the food intake within 10% of actual intake. Under the controlled conditions of this study, obese women more accurately recalled E, PRO, and CHO intake than did overweight and normal weight women despite probable under-eating on the day of study.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014