Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Storability and Processing Quality of Yellow Fleshed Potatoes

Authors
item Edwards, C - WSU, PULLMAN, WA
item Englar, J - NESTLE USA, MOSES LAKE,WA
item Brown, Charles
item Peterson, J - ENGLAR FOOD LAB, WA
item Sorensen, E - WSU EXTENSION, PASCO, WA

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 2, 2001
Publication Date: January 15, 2002
Citation: EDWARDS, C.G., ENGLAR, J.W., BROWN, C.R., PETERSON, J.C., SORENSEN, E. STORABILITY AND PROCESSING QUALITY OF YELLOW FLESHED POTATOES. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POTATO RESEARCH. 79:49-53. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: The potato industry in the U.S. is ready to try out non-conventional potatoes. Specifically there is an unmet demand for yellow fleshed varieties. We know very little about how to store and process these potatoes. The types of processed products for which these varieties would be best suited need to be identified. This publication reports the results sof testing several yellow-fleshed varieties and comparing them to white fleshed varieties. Interestingly the yellow fleshed varieties were quite varied in their responses. All of the yellow flesh varieties except Augsberg Gold accumulated reducing sugars at the coldest storage temperature. Augsberg Gold had an acceptably low concentration of reducing sugars when fried out of low temperature storage, showing "cold sweetening tolerance." Two other yellow-fleshed clones could be restored to a good frying status by holding them for several weeks at higher temperatures. This process, called "reconditioning" was possible with Yukon Gold and Red Gold. Two varieties, Yukon Gold and AO82283-1 were superior to Russet Burbank and Saginaw Gold in taste tests when processed into French fries. Clearly yellow-fleshed varieties exit that can serve the processing industry and be fashioned into highly marketable products.

Technical Abstract: Yellow-fleshed potatoes, Yukon Gold, Red Gold, Saginaw Gold, Augsberg Gold, and AO 82283.1 were compared to the standard cultivars Russet Burbank and Norchip for storage and quality attributes. In general, yellow-fleshed cultivars had higher hue angles and chroma values compared to the white- fleshed potatoes. Higher enzymatic browning rates expressed as L* per 180 min were observed for Norchip (-11.5), Russet Burbank (-9.7), and Red Gol (-9.7) compared to Yukon Gold (-2.9), Saginaw Gold (-2.1), or AO82283.1 (- 4.9). Lower concentrations of sucrose, glucose, and fructose were observed in tubers stored at 10 C in comparison to those stored at 3.3 and 8.3 C, the amount dependent on the cultivar or clone. Saginaw Gold, Augsberg Gold, and AO 82283.1 accumulated lower sugar levels than Russet Burbank and Norchip stored at 3.3 or 8.3 C. Although Yukon Gold and Red Gold accumulated high concentrations of reducing sugars if stored at 3.3 C, these cultivars responded well to reconditioning. Based on triangle sensor tests, potato chips made from Augsberg Gold and Yukon Gold were significantly different (pó0.05) from Norchip. Subsequent preference testing revealed that panels preferred the color of Saginaw Gold and Augsberg Gold over Norchip and Yukon Gold while Norchip, Saginaw Gold, and Augsberg Gold were rated equal in overall desirability. When processed into fries, Yukon Gold and AO 82283.1 achieved highest scores for texture, flavor, color and overall desirability than Saginaw Gold or Russet Burbank. These data indicate the possibility for commercially processing some yellow-fleshed cultivars.

Last Modified: 12/28/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page