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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Kenaf: Seed to Market

Authors
item Bledsoe, V.K. - TEXAS A&M, COMMERCE, TX
item Webber, Charles
item Bledsoe, R.E. - LADONIA MAKET CENTER, TX

Submitted to: Non-Weed Fibres and Crop Residues Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2001
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The commercial use of kenaf continues to diversify from its historical role as a cordage crop (rope, twine, and sackcloth) to its various new applications including paper products, building materials, absorbents, and livestock feed, choices within the decision matrix will continue to increase and involve issues ranging from basic agricultural production methods to marketing of kenaf products. The commercial success of kenaf also has important potential economic and environmental benefits in the areas of soil remediation, toxic waste cleanup, removal of oil spills on water, reduced chemical and energy use for paper production, greater recycled paper quality, reduced soil erosion due to wind and water, replacement or reduced use of fiberglass in industrial products, and the increased use of recycled plastics. As a result of the numerous uses for kenaf plant it is important to gain a greater understanding of the management factors involved in the kenaf production, harvesting, processing, and marketing system. This review includes an introduction to the crop, a short history, a profile of plant components, and an overview of the production, harvesting, and processing systems.

Technical Abstract: Although the chronological order moves from the planting of the kenaf seed to the marketing of the kenaf product, it is vital to first consider the kenaf market prior to planting the seed. In the same vein, the kenaf product produced and the market demands should be determined prior to the selection of the kenaf production, harvesting, and processing system. The commercial use of kenaf continues to diversify from its historical role as a cordage crop (rope, twine, and sackcloth) to its various new applications including paper products, building materials, absorbents, and livestock feed, choices within the decision matrix will continue to increase and involve issues ranging from basic agricultural production methods to marketing of kenaf products. These management decisions will require an understanding of the many different facets of kenaf and reliance on a systems approach that will integrate the production, harvesting, processing, and utilization of kenaf. The production, harvesting, and processing of kenaf, like any other agricultural system, must be capable of producing the quality and quantity of the desired product in a timely and economic manner. The purpose of this review is to provide a greater understanding of the kenaf production, harvesting, and processing systems to increase the potential use of kenaf and its products. This review includes an introduction to the crop, a short history, a profile of plant components, and an overview of the production, harvesting, and processing systems.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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