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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Eighty Years of Vegetation and Landscape Changes in the Northern Great Plains: a Photographic Record

Authors
item Klement, Keith
item Heitschmidt, Rodney
item Kay, Charles - UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: USDA ARS Conservation Research Report
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2001
Publication Date: December 1, 2001
Citation: KLEMENT, K.D., HEITSCHMIDT, R.K., KAY, C.E. EIGHTY YEARS OF VEGETATION AND LANDSCAPE CHANGES IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORD. USDA ARS CONSERVATION RESEARCH REPORT. 91 pages. 2001.

Interpretive Summary: This publication is a photographic record of vegetation and landscape changes that have occurred at selected sites in the Northern Great Plains over the past 80 to 90 years. Based on photographic and written records, the authors found few changes had taken place other than (1) a general increase in the density and cover of woody plant species, particularly Ponderosa pine; (2) those resulting from direct human intervention, such as tillage, haying, and road construction; and (3) a general increase in nonindigenous species, particularly yellow sweet clover and created wheatgrass, as they escape from roadside restoration projects and agronomic plantings. Otherwise, the changes are subtle. Audiences for the publication include researchers, naturalists, land managements, policy makers, and the general public.

Technical Abstract: This publication is a photographic record of vegetation and landscape changes that have occurred at selected sites in the Northern Great Plains over the past 80 to 90 years. Based on photographic and written records, the authors found few changes had taken place other than (1) a general increase in the density and cover of woody plant species, particularly Ponderosa pine; (2) those resulting from direct human intervention, such as tillage, haying, and road construction; and (3) a general increase in nonindigenous species, particularly yellow sweet clover and created wheatgrass, as they escape from roadside restoration projects and agronomic plantings. Otherwise, the changes are subtle. Audiences for the publication include researchers, naturalists, land managements, policy makers, and the general public.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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