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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Garden Pea

Author
item McPhee, Kevin

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2003
Publication Date: December 1, 2004
Citation: Mcphee, K.E. 2004. Garden pea. In: Singh, P.K., Dasgupta, S.K., Tripathi, S.K. editors. Hybrid Vegetable Development. Binghampton, NY: Food Products Press. p. 277-288.

Interpretive Summary: Pea is an important source of nutrients and protein in animal feed and human diets worldwide, especially in developing countries. The genetic diversity in pea has allowed of many different types to be produced in very diverse environments. Resistance to biotic and abiotic stress is available and routinely incorporated into new cultivars. Although male sterility mechanisms and hybrid vigor is documented in pea no hybrid cultivars have been developed or commercialized. Seed production and maintenance of inbred pure lines is accomplished through bulk production or single plant selection in disease free fields separated by at least 30 m from neighboring pea fields. Wide adaptation and use of modern technology in cultivar improvement ensure that pea will continue to be an important agronomic crop worldwide.

Technical Abstract: Pea (Pisum sativum L.) has been grown for food and feed since its domestication in the Mediterranean region in approximately 7000 B.C. It serves as an excellent source of protein, fiber, minerals and vitamins especially in developing countries. There are many benefits to including pea in crop rotations including nitrogen fixation through symbiotic association with Rhizobium leguminosarum. Genetic diversity in pea germplasm is wide and is represented by the myriad of types produced. Several biotic and abiotic stresses constrain production worldwide. Biotic stresses include several insect and disease pests. Genetic resistance is available for many of the diseases and when coupled with cultural control methods can be effectively controlled. Insect pests are most commonly controlled through insecticide applications. Heterosis and male sterility are present in pea, however, to date no hybrid cultivars have been developed or commercialized due to difficulty associated with cross pollination. Seed production and maintenance of inbred pure lines is accomplished through bulk production or single plant selection in disease free fields separated by at least 30 m from neighboring pea fields. Clean equipment, routine field inspection and use of electronic eye technology further increase seed purity. Wide adaptation and use of modern technology in cultivar improvement ensure that pea will continue to be an important agronomic crop worldwide.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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