Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of Flax Cotton Blend Ratio on Dyebath Exhaustion and Color Yield of C.I. Direct Blue 1 and C.I. Direct Red 80

Authors
item Annis, P - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Etters, J - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Sarkar, A - CO ST UNIV FT COLLINS CO
item Akin, Danny

Submitted to: Proceedings Of The American Association Of Textile Chemists And Colorists
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2001
Publication Date: March 15, 2002
Citation: Annis, P.A., Etters, J.N., Sarkar, A.K., Akin, D.E. 2002. Influence of flax cotton blend ratio on dyebath exhaustion and color yield of c.i. direct blue 1 and c.i. direct red 80. American Association Of Textile Chemists And Colorists Review; pp. 26-28.

Interpretive Summary: Flax in important world-wide but is not produced commercially in the US. Development of a flax fiber industry could potentially enhance farm income by providing a high-value crop with ready markets. However, processing of flax is different from cotton, and research is needed on how best to treat flax-cotton blends for quality products. Research was carried out on the dyeing characteristics of blended fabrics that varied in proportions flax and cotton, showing that inclusion of flax caused variations in dyeing quality. Research are important in showing that processing must be carried out to specifically address particular properties of flax to make quality products.

Technical Abstract: Results in this investigation reveal that the coloristic efficiency of two direct dyes decreases as the flax content of a flax/cotton fabric increases. A possible reason for such observed behavior is that light scattering from the surface of the flax fiber is higher than that of cotton. A practical consequence of the observed behavior is that more dye may be needed in commercial dyeing processes to obtain the same shade dept on fabrics of high flax content than is needed on 100% cotton fabric. Improved processing or improved retting methods, such as by use of enzymes as is now being explored, to provide a cleaner and more consistent fiber surface could improve dyeing performance.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page