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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: An Overview of the 1999 Angus Sire Alliance

Authors
item Herring, W - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Macneil, Michael

Submitted to: Beef Improvement Federation Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2001
Publication Date: July 1, 2001
Citation: HERRING, W.O., MACNEIL, M.D. AN OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ANGUS SIRE ALLIANCE. BEEF IMPROVEMENT FEDERATION PROCEEDINGS. 2001. p. 147-157.

Interpretive Summary: Expected progeny differences (EPD) have been used to improve individual traits. However, strategies are needed to aid producers in efficient multiple-trait selection. The Angus Sire Alliance was formed to identify bulls that produce the most profitable progeny and market those sires based on the research results. One objective was to develop a multiple-trait selection index to improve profit for a defined production scenario and to subsequently rank sires based on results of a multi-trait genetic evaluation for profit. Angus sires were randomly mated to commercial Angus females in a designed progeny testing program. Data were included from the 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 Angus Sire Alliance progeny test programs. EPD and associated accuracies were calculated for birth weight, weaning weight direct, weaning weight maternal, post-weaning average daily gain, marbling score, yield grade, and dry matter intake. To estimate relative economic values (REV) for each trait, a bio-economic simulation was performed using a modified version of the software SIMUMATE 3.0. Sire differences in profit per progeny were then estimated as the product of each trait EPD with its respective REV. There was a range of $41.65 profit per progeny between the highest and lowest ranking sires evaluated. If the bulls evaluated provide a sample of, at least, the average genetic profile that exists within the Angus breed, it is evident that large differences exist in profit potential. By using an approach such as the one described it can be shown that attaching added value to certain herd sire prospects is warranted if the genetics of the prospect can be accurately described. Commercial cattlemen should be encouraged to use a more comprehensive approach to genetically alter profit than single trait selection.

Technical Abstract: Expected progeny differences (EPD) have been used to improve individual traits. However, strategies are needed to aid producers in efficient multiple-trait selection. The Angus Sire Alliance was formed to identify bulls that produce the most profitable progeny and market those sires based on the research results. One objective was to develop a multiple-trait selection index to improve profit for a defined production scenario and to subsequently rank sires based on results of a multi-trait genetic evaluation for profit. Angus sires were randomly mated to commercial Angus females in a designed progeny testing program. Data were included from the 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 Angus Sire Alliance progeny test programs. EPD and associated accuracies were calculated for birth weight, weaning weight direct, weaning weight maternal, post-weaning average daily gain, marbling score, yield grade, and dry matter intake. To estimate relative economic values (REV) for each trait, a bio-economic simulation was performed using a modified version of the software SIMUMATE 3.0. Sire differences in profit per progeny were then estimated as the product of each trait EPD with its respective REV. There was a range of $41.65 profit per progeny between the highest and lowest ranking sires evaluated. If the bulls evaluated provide a sample of, at least, the average genetic profile that exists within the Angus breed, it is evident that large differences exist in profit potential. By using an approach such as the one described it can be shown that attaching added value to certain herd sire prospects is warranted if the genetics of the prospect can be accurately described. Commercial cattlemen should be encouraged to use a more comprehensive approach to genetically alter profit than single trait selection.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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