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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Sensory Comparison of Runner Peanut Market Grades from Selected Varieties

Authors
item Pattee, Harold
item Isleib, Thomas - NC STATE UNIVERSITY
item Gorbet, Daniel - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Giesbrecht, Francis - NC STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2002
Publication Date: December 15, 2002
Citation: PATTEE, H.E., ISLEIB, T.G., GORBET, D.W., GIESBRECHT, F.G. SENSORY COMPARISON OF RUNNER PEANUT MARKET GRADES FROM SELECTED VARIETIES. PEANUT SCIENCE. 2002. V. 29. P. 146-149.

Interpretive Summary: Peanut processors have often inquired concerning the sensory quality difference between market grades. Triangle matching and trained panelists were used to determine if a flavor difference between adjacent grades of runner peanuts could be discerned and what sensory attributes might contribute to any possible discernment. All comparisons of medium versus No. 1 grades were correctly matched. However, jumbo and medium were only matched 49% of the time. Sensory attributes fruity and sweet were probably the main contributors to sensory discernment across the three grades.

Technical Abstract: Peanut processors have often inquired concerning the sensory quality difference between market grades. Triangle comparison testing and trained panelists were used to determine if a flavor difference could be discerned between adjacent grades from selected runner peanut varieties and what sensory attributes might contribute to any possible discernment. Significant differences in flavor were attained in four out of ten combinations: jumbo versus medium kernels of Florida MDR 98 and all three comparisons of medium versus No. 1. When the flavor data were pooled across combinations, panelists were able to correctly discern the difference between jumbo and medium kernels 49% of the time (P<0.05) and between medium and No. 1 kernels 90% of the time (P<0.01). The adjusted mean sensory scores were significantly different among the three grades for fruity and sweet attributes but not for roasted peanut or bitter. It is probable that the inability to show a difference in roasted peanut is an anomaly of the selected varieties, specifically UF97318 that had a reversal in roasted peanut across grades. The flavor intensity range for fruity and sweet was greater than 0.5 units. This difference contributed strongly to the panelists' ability to correctly discern between them 90% of the time. Although there were no significant differences between jumbo and medium kernels for any attribute, panelists were able to discern between them correctly 49% of the time. One can only conclude that the ability of panelists to discern between jumbo and medium is the result of a combination of small differences, no single attribute of which is sufficient to be detectable alone, i.e., greater than 0.5 units.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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