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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Mineralization of Manure Nutrients

Authors
item Eghball, Bahman
item Wienhold, Brian
item Gilley, John

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2001
Publication Date: November 1, 2001
Citation: EGHBALL, B., WIENHOLD, B.J., GILLEY, J.E. MINERALIZATION OF MANURE NUTRIENTS. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS #142049. 2001.

Interpretive Summary: In order to apply manure to fulfill crop nutrient requirements, the amount of nutrients mineralized in actual field conditions needs to be determined. Available N from applied manure includes inorganic-N (NO3- N and NH4-N) plus the amount of organic-N mineralized following application. About 20% of organic-N in beef cattle feedlot manure was mineralized during the corn-growing season (June-October). Nitrogen availability from beef cattle feedlot manure was found to be about 40% of total manure N in the first year after application and about 15% in the second year. Nitrogen availability from composted manure was about 20% in the first and 8% in the second year. In the first year after application, N availability is expected to be about 90% for swine manure, 50% for dairy manure, and 75% for poultry manure. Phosphorus availability was found to be 82% of applied beef cattle manure P, and 71% of the composted manure P in the first year after application. Phosphorus availability from other animal species should be similar or slightly higher than beef cattle manure. Potassium availability should be close to 100% for manure from all animal species indicating that manure K can be used similar to K fertilizer for crop production.

Technical Abstract: In order to apply manure to fulfill crop nutrient requirements, the amount of nutrients mineralized in actual field conditions needs to be determined. Available N from applied manure includes inorganic-N (NO3- N and NH4-N) plus the amount of organic-N mineralized following application. About 20% of organic-N in beef cattle feedlot manure was mineralized during the corn-growing season (June-October). Nitrogen availability from beef cattle feedlot manure was found to be about 40% of total manure N in the first year after application and about 15% in the second year. Nitrogen availability from composted manure was about 20% in the first and 8% in the second year. In the first year after application, N availability is expected to be about 90% for swine manure, 50% for dairy manure, and 75% for poultry manure. Phosphorus availability was found to be 82% of applied beef cattle manure P, and 71% of the composted manure P in the first year after application. Phosphorus availability from other animal species should be similar or slightly higher than beef cattle manure. Potassium availability should be close to 100% for manure from all animal species indicating that manure K can be used similar to K fertilizer for crop production.

Last Modified: 12/27/2014
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