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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Greenhouse Gas Emission of Soil Differing in Carbon Level and Manure Treatment

Authors
item Ginting, Daniel - UNIV OF NE/LINCOLN
item Eghball, Bahman
item Kessavalou, Anabayan - MONSANTO - KANSAS CITY
item Doran, John
item Shapiro, Charles - UNIV OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 21, 2001
Publication Date: November 1, 2001
Citation: GINTING, D., EGHBALL, B., KESSAVALOU, A., DORAN, J.W., SHAPIRO, C. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION OF SOIL DIFFERING IN CARBON LEVEL AND MANURE TREATMENT. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS #152816. 2001.

Interpretive Summary: SAME AS ABSTRACT

Technical Abstract: Greenhouse gas emission from soil is critical aspect of site-specific management of C-N inputs based on soil organic matter (OM) level. Our objective is to evaluate C-N gas emission of soil amended with cattle and swine manure, and urea ammonium nitrate on soils varying in OM levels. Two (Phillips and Concord, NE) experimental sites (differed in soil textures) were treated with urea ammonium nitrate (UAN), cattle manure, and swine manure annually since fall 1998. In each site, CO2- C, CH4-C, and N2O-N emissions were measured in six to eight events each year at spots (low and high OM levels) receiving manure and UAN, and at control plots (low and high in OM levels) receiving no amendments. In both sites, 86% of the times of CO2-C emissions from manure were similar to those from UAN and the control plots. Soil OM level (93% of the time) did not result in differences in CO2-C emissions. Presumably, the incorporation of corn plant biomass into the soil after harvest masked the effects (if any) of manure and soil OM level. Emissions of CH4-C were negligible compared to the CO2-C. The N2O-N gas emission varied with sites. Soil OM level, and C-N inputs did not affects N2O-N emissions at clay loam soils of Concord during 1999 and 2000. At the coarser texture soil of Phillips, however, N-fertilizer application resulted in greater N2O-N emissions compared to those from manure or control plots in four of six events during 1999. Similarity of gas emission between low and high soil OM indicated that gas emission is not a negative factor for a site-specific manure management on soil OM basis. In terms of soil greenhouse gas emissions, the use of manure to supply soil N is preferable.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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