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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Defending the Profitability of Growing Potato in the Columbia Basin: Developing the Corky Ringspot and Columbia Root-Knot Nematode Resistant Germplasm

Authors
item Brown, Charles
item Mojtahedi, H. - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Santo, G. - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Hamm, P. - OREGON STATE UNIV HERMIS
item Novy, Richard
item Corsini, Dennis
item Love, S. - UNIV OF IDAHO ABERDEEN
item James, S. - OREGON STATE UNIV MADRAS

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2001
Publication Date: September 1, 2001
Citation: Brown, C.R., Mojtahedi, H., Santo, G.S., Hamm, P., Novy, R.G., Corsini, D.L., Love, S., James, S. 2001. Defending the profitability of growing potato in the columbia basin: developing the corky ringspot and columbia root-knot nematode resistant germplasm. American Journal of Potato Research. 78:446.

Interpretive Summary: Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) and corky ringspot disease (CRS) together pose serious risks to potato quality and yield in the Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon. The cost of two fumigation treatments approximates $350 per acre, and the types of fumigants pose environmental problems that will continue to be controversial in the future. Resistance to Columbia root knot nematode has been found in several wild Mexican species, and has been introgressed into advanced backcross generations. Resistance to CRS is ubiquitous in advanced breeding materials. The resistance to CRS has been found to be active against the tobacco rattle virus, and not against the vector, stubby root nematode (Paratrichodorus allius). Combined resistance to root- knot and CRS has been selected for the first time in materials that have long tuber shape, high yield, and good frying qualities. The patchy occurrence of CRS, even in fields with severe infection pressure, poses a problem in reliability of screening results. It appears that supplementation of inoculum, by adding soil with pot-grown viruliferous nematodes to field plots, may help to homogenize severity of disease pressure, but timing of inoculation appears to be crucial. There appears to be considerable variation in virulence of nematode-virus cultures has occurred, meaning that some clones are resistant to one culture, but not another. Similarly, some clones are resistant in one field but not another. Fortunately, strong non-specific CRS resistance has also been found and used to advance the program.

Technical Abstract: Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) and corky ringspot disease (CRS) together pose serious risks to potato quality and yield in the Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon. The cost of two fumigation treatments approximates $350 per acre, and the types of fumigants pose environmental problems that will continue to be controversial in the future. Resistance to Columbia root knot nematode has been found in several wild Mexican species, and has been introgressed into advanced backcross generations. Resistance to CRS is ubiquitous in advanced breeding materials. The resistance to CRS has been found to be active against the tobacco rattle virus, and not against the vector, stubby root nematode (Paratrichodorus allius). Combined resistance to root- knot and CRS has been selected for the first time in materials that have long tuber shape, high yield, and good frying qualities. The patchy occurrence of CRS, even in fields with severe infection pressure, poses a problem in reliability of screening results. It appears that supplementation of inoculum, by adding soil with pot-grown viruliferous nematodes to field plots, may help to homogenize severity of disease pressure, but timing of inoculation appears to be crucial. There appears to be considerable variation in virulence of nematode-virus cultures has occurred, meaning that some clones are resistant to one culture, but not another. Similarly, some clones are resistant in one field but not another. Fortunately, strong non-specific CRS resistance has also been found and used to advance the program.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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