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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of the Rusle Soil Erosion Model

Authors
item Yoder, Daniel - UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
item Foster, George - PRIVATE CONTRACTOR
item Weesies, Glenn - USDA-NRCS
item Renard, Kenneth - USDA-ARS RETIRED
item McCool, Donald
item Lown, Joel - UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

Submitted to: Water Resources Bulletin
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2001
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Hydrologic and water quality models are important tools for land and natural resource managers. This paper presents an overview and evaluation of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and briefly discusses the background of RUSLE as it evolved from the USLE and the basic changes involved in the revision. The validation of RUSLE is discussed, though limited data restrict the analysis for all except standard cropping and management situations. The evaluation examines the new situations to which RUSLE can be applied, including those requiring estimates of sediment delivery and those representing significantly different land uses. The changes in RUSLE make it useful for estimating erosion and sediment yield not only from agronomic settings, but also for situations involving construction, mine spoils, and land reclamation.

Technical Abstract: As part of a broader effort to provide more information on hydrologic and water quality models, this paper presents an overview and evaluation of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). It briefly discusses the background of RUSLE as it evolved from the USLE, and the basic changes involved in the revision. The validation of RUSLE is discussed, though limited data restrict the analysis for all except the standard cropping and management situations. The evaluation examines the new situations to which RUSLE can be applied, including those requiring estimates of sediment delivery and representing significantly different land uses. The changes in RUSLE make it useful for estimating erosion and sediment yield not only from agronomic settings, but also for situations involving construction, mine spoils, and land reclamation. The analysis then examines the strengths and weaknesses of the current RUSLE layout and computer interface and the changes being included in the new RUSLE2 program. Finally, the overview includes a listing of sources for the program and supporting documentation.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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