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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Quantifying Wheel-Track Effects on Soil Hydraulic Properties for Agricultural Systems Modeling

Authors
item Ahuja, Lajpat
item Benjamin, Joseph
item Dunn, Gale
item Ma, Liwang
item Green, Timothy
item Peterson, G - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Soil Dynamics International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 31, 2000
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: We measured soil hydraulic properties on intact soil cores from wheel track and no-wheel track areas of four soil types, after long-term no-till or reduced-till crop rotations in semiarid eastern Colorado. The soil texture varied from sandy loam to silt loam. The results showed a large variability but no consistent differences in water retention curves and hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) between track and no-track areas. However, all water retention and Ksat data could be quantified by essentially universal models that require only soil bulk density and 33-kPa water content. For water retention data from three field soils in the literature where wheel track effects were significant, we present a simple model to derive retention curves for track areas from curves of the no-track areas. This is presented as a topic for further research. The Ksat data for these soils were consistent with the general Ksat-effective porosity relationship pdeveloped previously.

Technical Abstract: We measured soil hydraulic properties on intact soil cores from wheel track and no-wheel track areas of four soil types, after long-term no-till or reduced-till crop rotations in semiarid eastern Colorado. The soil texture varied from sandy loam to silt loam. The results showed a large variability but no consistent differences in water retention curves and hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) between track and no-track areas. However, all water retention and Ksat data could be quantified by essentially universal models that require only soil bulk density and 33-kPa water content. For water retention data from three field soils in the literature where wheel track effects were significant, we present a simple model to derive retention curves for track areas from curves of the no-track areas. This is presented as a topic for further research. The Ksat data for these soils were consistent with the general Ksat-effective porosity relationship pdeveloped previously.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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