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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Map for the Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha Suspensa, and Occurrence of Mitochondrial DNA Diversity Within Highly Inbred Colonies.

Authors
item Heath, Martha
item Kuhn, David - FIU
item Schnell Ii, Raymond
item Tondo, Cecile

Submitted to: Biochemical Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 7, 2001
Publication Date: August 20, 2002
Citation: HEATH, M.A., KUHN, D.N., SCHNELL II, R.J., OLANO, C.T. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA RESTRICTION MAP FOR THE CARIBBEAN FRUIT FLY, ANASTREPHA SUSPENSA, AND OCCURRENCE OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA DIVERSITY WITHIN HIGHLY INBRED COLONIES.. BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: The Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa, is a tephritid fruit fly pest of economic importance. Since colonization in the 1960's, it has been established in Florida. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been used with another fruit fly, viz. the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata, to determine the geographical origin of the infestation when flies are accidentally introduced in the U.S. We studied the mtDNA of A. suspensa to construct a restriction map. To our knowledge, this map will be the first complete restriction map for an Anastrepha spp. Surprisingly, we found two mitochondrial types in colony-reared flies from Miami, FL, Gainesville, FL, and in a wild population. This information will be used to compare the Florida population with flies that have remained geographically isolated in the Caribbean. Since introductions of other Anastrepha spp. pose threats to U.S. agriculture, this work will provide the framework for the study of mtDNA from other species which have the potential for establishment in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: A restriction map has been constructed for Anastrepha suspensa mtDNA. One HaeIII site was found to be variable within highly inbred colonies and a feral population. From 30 - 43% of the individual flies studied had this haplotype. Based on mapping information, this site was determined to be in the ATPase 6 gene. Primers TK-J-3785 and C3-N-5460 amplified this region. The amplicon was cut by HaeIII in flies of one haplotype and not cut in flies of the other haplotype.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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