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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: COMPARISON OF RESISTIVE TO AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISKFACTORS OF SEDENTARY, OVERWEIGHT PREMENOPAUSAL AND POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN.

Authors
item Behall, Kay
item Howe, Juliette
item Martel, Gregory - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Scott, JR., William - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Dooly, Catherine - BALL STATE UNIV, IN.

Submitted to: Nutrition Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 21, 2003
Publication Date: March 1, 2003
Citation: Behall, K.M., Howe, J.C., Martel, G., Scott, Jr., W.H., Dooly, C. 2003. Comparison of resistive to aerobic exercise training on cardiovascular riskfactors of sedentary, overweight premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Nutrition Research. 23:607-619.

Interpretive Summary: Most health organizations recommend individuals with cardiovascular disease or diabetes to decrease risk factors such as obesity and elevated blood lipids for improved health status. Physical inactivity has also been indicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular heart disease. Currently there is little information comparing the type of training to changes in plasma lipids, especially in postmenopausal women. Five premenopausal and 7 postmenopausal subjects maintained a 12 week resistive training program, while five premenopausal and 6 postmenopausal subjects participated in a 12 week aerobic training program, i.e. walking on a treadmill. Triglyceride levels of the postmenopausal women and total and LDL cholesterol of both premenopausal and postmentopausal women were significantly lower after exercise compared to prestudy levels. Both types of exercise resulted in significant reduction in total (aerobic, 17.9%; resistive, 14.2%) and LDL (aerobic, 25.6%; resistive, 19.9%) cholesterol. Cholesterol decreased the greatest in the postmenopausal women who participated in aerobic exercise (20.8%) with the other exercise groups showing smaller decreases (premenopausal aerobic, 14.1%; premenopausal resistive 15.4%; postmenopausal resistive, 13.3%). Results indicate that the type of exercise performed was more important to postmenopausal than premenopausal women. Walking is considered to be an inherently safe, convenient and accessible form of moderately intensity exercise suitable for older women and can easily be incorporated into a daily routine. Based on these results, health professionals can recommend a regular walking program as an effective long term exercise for older women.

Technical Abstract: Physical inactivity, like hypercholesterolemia, has been indicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular heart disease. However, there is little information comparing type of training to changes in plasma lipids, especially in postmenopausal women. Five premenopausal and 7 postmenopausal women maintained a resistive training program, while five premenopausal and 6 postmenopausal women participated in an aerobic training program, i.e. walking on a treadmill. Lipid measurements were made before and after the 12 week study. Triglyceride levels of the postmenopausal and total and LDL cholesterol of both premenopausal and postmentopausal women were significantly lower after exercise compared to prestudy levels. Both types of exercise resulted in significant reduction in total (aerobic, 17.9%; resistive, 14.2%) and LDL (aerobic, 25.6%; resistive, 19.9%) cholesterol. Postmenopausal women who participated in aerobic exercise showed the greatest decrease (20.8%) in cholesterol with the other exercise groups showing smaller decreases. No significant difference was found in the HDL cholesterol levels. Results indicate that the type of exercise performed was more important to postmenopausal than premenopausal women. Walking is considered to be an inherently safe, convenient and accessible form of moderately intensity exercise suitable for older women and can easily be incorporated into a daily. Based on these results and similar reports, health professionals can recommend a regular walking program as an effective long term exercise for older women. Based on these results, health professionals can recommend walking as an effective exercise for older women.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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