Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Resistance to Acarapis Woodi by Honey Bees from Far-Eastern Russia

Authors
item De Guzman, Lilia
item Rinderer, Thomas
item Delatte, Gary
item Stelzer, John
item Beaman, Glenda
item Kuznetsov, Victor - RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENC

Submitted to: Apidologie
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2002
Publication Date: July 15, 2002
Citation: DeGuzman, L.I., Rinderer, T.E., Delatte, G.T., Stelzer, J.A., Beaman, L., Kuznetsov, V. Resistance to Acarapis Woodi by Honey Bees from Far-Eastern Russia. Apidologie, 2002, Vol. 33, No. 4, pgs. 411-415.

Interpretive Summary: Honey bees from the Primorsky region of far-eastern Russia were imported into the U. S. in 1997 and have been released to the United States beekeeping industry because of their strong resistance to Varroa destructor. In order to more fully evaluate the commercial value of Russian honey bees, we conducted a field study to explore their comparative response to Acarapis woodi infestations. Results from a field test in Louisiana showed that Russian honey bees had useful resistance to tracheal mites. The Russian honey bees maintained nearly mite-free colonies throughout the experiment while the domestic stocks developed high levels of tracheal mite infestations. Thus, the use of Russian honey bees should require few to no treatments to control tracheal mites. Further study should be done to detect the mechanisms of resistance to tracheal mites employed by Russian honey bees. Some features of their tracheal mite resistance may be shown to result from mechanisms that support resistance to V. destructor.

Technical Abstract: Honey bees (Apis mellifera) from the Primorsky region of far- eastern Russia were evaluated for their resistance to Acarapis woodi. Results from a field test in Louisiana showed that Russian honey bees had useful resistance to tracheal mites. The Russian honey bees maintained nearly mite-free colonies throughout the experiment while the domestic stocks were ultimately parasitized by high levels of tracheal mites. Further study should be done to detect the mechanisms of resistance to tracheal mites employed by Russian honey bees.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page