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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Sensory Characteristics and Instrumental Texture Attributes of Abalones, Haliotis Fulgens and Cracherodii

Authors
item Sanchez-Brambila, Gabriela - CIAD
item Lyon, Brenda
item Huang, Yao-Wen - UNIVIERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Lyon, Clyde
item Gates, Keith - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 19, 2001
Publication Date: April 1, 2002

Interpretive Summary: Haliotis cracherodii (Black abalone)is more abundant than H. fulgens (Blue abalones from Pacific coasts of Mexico and California but is less marketable due to tough texture. Tenderization treatments of black abalone (Halitosis cracherodii) were conducted using papain solutions (0.25% or 0.50%) with tumbling (10 or 20 min) prior to canning. The top (adductor) and foot (opercular)muscles were evaluated by sensory and instrumental methods and compared to untreated black abalone, to untreated blue abalone (H. fulgens) and to commercially canned blue abalone. Papain treatment did not significantly alter the texture of the abalone but did increase metallic and bitter character notes. Instrumental texture measurements that correlated with sensory texture measurements may be useful in the establishment of quality parameters for canned abalone.

Technical Abstract: Haliotis cracherodii (Black abalone)is more abundant than H. fulgens (Blue abalones from Pacific coasts of Mexico and California but is less marketable due to tough texture. Tenderization treatments of black abalone (Halitosis cracherodii) were conducted using papain solutions (0.25% or 0.50%) with tumbling (10 or 20 min) prior to canning. The adductor and foot body sections were evaluated by sensory and instrumental methods. Instrumental texture was determined using Warner-Bratzler shear force (kg) and TAXT2 Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) with a two-cycle, 60% strain test. There were significant differences between the two species of abalones and between the top (adductor) and foot (opercular) muscles within each species. However, the papain treatments of the black abalone were not significantly different. Sensory and instrumental texture measurements that correlated could be useful in the establishment of quality control measures for canned abalone. This study also established a sensory lexicon for evaluating the flavor and texture profile of canned abalone products.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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