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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Copper Sulfate-Citric Acid Treatment for Control of Snails Transmitting Fish Parasites.

Author
item Mitchell, Andrew

Submitted to: American Fishery Society (Fish Health Section) Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 6, 2000
Publication Date: September 6, 2000
Citation: MITCHELL, A.J. A COPPER SULFATE-CITRIC ACID TREATMENT FOR CONTROL OF SNAILS TRANSMITTING FISH PARASITES.. AMERICAN FISHERY SOCIETY (FISH HEALTH SECTION) PROCEEDINGS. 2000. p.18.

Technical Abstract: Propagated fish species are infected with a number of digenetic trematodes that are transmitted by snails. Ram's horn snails of the genus Planorbella carry at least two important pathogens of cultured fish, the yellow grub Clinostomum complanatum and the catfish trematode Bolbophorus confusus. Reduction in numbers of snails is presently the only reasonable option for controlling these trematodes in three to ten hectare ponds. Most snails in aquaculture ponds are found within two meters of the pond's edge. Most water-applied chemical treatments that kill snails are also toxic to the fish reared in the pond. The chemical combination of 4536 g of copper sulfate and 454 g of citric acid, mixed in a stock solution with at least 250 L of water, was applied in a two meter wide swath for a length of 76.2 m along the edge of a 0.4 ha pond. In two separate studies the average survival of snails in the combination treatment was 2% and 0% verses sham treatment's survival rate of 63% and 77% respectively. The effectiveness of the treatment against snails and safety to the propagated species are affected by water temperature, the total alkalinity of the water, pond size, and pond shape.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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