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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Collection of soybean loopers and other noctuids in phenylacetaldehyde-baited traps

Author
item Meagher, Robert

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: January 12, 2001
Publication Date: March 1, 2001
Citation: Meagher Jr, R.L. 2001. Collection of soybean loopers and other noctuids in phenylacetaldehyde-baited traps. Florida Entomologist. 84(1):154-155.

Interpretive Summary: Several moths, such as fall armyworm, soybean looper, and velvetbean caterpillar, are pests whose larvae attack various row crops such as corn, rice, forage grasses, cotton, and peanuts in the eastern and central United States. These moths are present all year in southern Florida and Texas, but they migrate northward during spring, summer, and fall. Growers of sweet corn in southern Florida may apply over 20 insecticide applications per season to control fall armyworm, and the other pests damage crops by feeding on leaves. Because of environmental concerns over insecticide applications, new population monitoring techniques and alternative control strategies are needed. Sex pheromone baits were developed and are used to detect and measure population sizes. Scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, Florida, are improving trapping techniques that will aid in monitoring adult populations. This report describes capture of soybean looper moths and other moth species in traps baited with the synthetic floral chemical phenylacetaldehyde. Tests were conducted in cotton and fallow fields, and results showed that this chemical attracted both male and females moths of several important pests to traps.

Technical Abstract: This note describes capture of soybean looper moths and other noctuids in Unitraps baited with the synthetic floral volatile phenylacetaldehyde. These traps are currently used in agricultural sites by growers, consultants and county extension workers.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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