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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Runoff Losses of N and P from Soils Receiving Manure from Swine Fed Low Phytate and Traditional Corn Diets

Authors
item WIENHOLD, BRIAN
item Paschold, Julie
item GILLEY, JOHN

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2000
Publication Date: October 10, 2000
Citation: WIENHOLD, B.J., PASCHOLD, J.S., GILLEY, J.E. RUNOFF LOSSES OF N AND P FROM SOILS RECEIVING MANURE FROM SWINE FED LOW PHYTATE AND TRADITIONAL CORN DIETS. AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS. P. 208. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Runoff losses of N and P from soils receiving animal manure contribute to eutrophication of surface waters. Low phytate corn as a feed source has the potential to reduce P content of swine manure. Runoff losses of N and P were measured from plots receiving either manure from swine fed a low phytate diet, manure from swine fed a traditional corn diet, or inorganic fertilizer. Eight runoff events occurred during the 1999 growing season removing 2.9 kg/ha of sediment from the plots. Inorganic N and dissolved P concentrations were highest during the first runoff event. Most N leaving the plots in runoff was in the organic form. Concentration of N and P in runoff were strongly correlated with application rates.

Technical Abstract: Runoff losses of N and P from soils receiving animal manure contribute to eutrophication of surface waters. Low phytate corn as a feed source has the potential to reduce P content of swine manure. Runoff losses of N and P were measured from plots receiving either manure from swine fed a low phytate diet, manure from swine fed a traditional corn diet, or inorganic fertilizer. Eight runoff events occurred during the 1999 growing season removing 2.9 kg/ha of sediment from the plots. Inorganic N and dissolved P concentrations were highest during the first runoff event. Most N leaving the plots in runoff was in the organic form. Concentration of N and P in runoff were strongly correlated with application rates.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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