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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Natural Enemies in Orchards: Some Topics for Research

Author
item Horton, David

Submitted to: Good Fruit Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 2000
Publication Date: July 20, 2000
Citation: Horton, D.R. 2000. Natural enemies in orchards: some topics for research. Good Fruit Grower. 51(12):17-18.

Interpretive Summary: The decreased use of insecticides with implementation of mating disruption for controlling codling moth increases densities of non-target arthropods in the orchard. Spiders are often very abundant in orchards, but their prey preferences, if any, and feeding activities in orchards are virtually unstudied. Another study that is missing is the rate at which predators attack their prey. Taking leaf samples or beat tray samples are two very useful methods of monitoring pests in orchards. It is important to control many pests of orchards in the spring or in the previous fall to prevent problems from arising during the summer. Natural enemies in orchards spend a lot of time away from the fruit tree, either in the ground cover or outside of the orchard. Effective use of these natural enemies requires that we invest in basic and applied research, conducted in both the laboratory and field.

Technical Abstract: The decreased use of insecticides associated with implementation of mating disruption for controlling codling moth prompts increases in densities of non-target arthropods in the orchard, both pest and beneficial arthropods. Efficient use of natural enemies in mating disrupted orchards requires information about aspects of their life histories, behavior, population biology, and prey preferences.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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