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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Pathogenicity of Oregon and Washington Isolates of Tobacco Rattle Virus on Potato

Authors
item Mojtahedi, H - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Crosslin, James
item Santo, G - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Brown, Charles
item Thomas, Peter

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2000
Publication Date: January 15, 2001
Citation: MOJTAHEDI, H., CROSSLIN, J., SANTO, G.S., BROWN, C.R., THOMAS, P.E. PATHOGENICITY OF OREGON AND WASHINGTON ISOLATES OF TOBACCO RATTLE VIRUS ON POTATO. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POTATO RESEARCH. 78:183-190. 2001.

Technical Abstract: Soil samples from corky ringspot (CRS) problem fields in Washington and Oregon were collected and planted with 'Samsun NN' tobacco to bait tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and increase Paratrichodorus allius populations, a known vector of TRV in the region. Pathogenicity of three isolates of TRV on Russet Burbank and Norkotah potato plants was studied using P. allius as vector. The most severe CRS symptoms on potato tubers was associated with TRV from Pasco, WA, followed by Umatilla, OR, and Mattawa, WA indicating a distinct variation in their virulence. The lowest number of P. allius that transmitted TRV and caused CRS symptoms on Norkotah was 3 nematodes per 250 cubic cm soil. Three-wk old potato seedlings exposed to P. allius at different intervals, produced symptomless tubers only if the inoculation was delayed for 9 wk, suggesting that tubers on 12-wk old plants were resistant to CRS. The older the potato plants became in pot culture, the more CRS symptoms intensified on tubers. The data suggested that subsequent reproduction of P. allius on daughter potato plant did not influence the CRS incidence and severity on tubers. The techniques employed in these studies did not break the CRS resistance of potato cultivar Bintje.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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