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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ability of a Nutrition Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior Instrument to Discriminate among Adults in the Lower Mississippi Delta.

Authors
item Zaghloul, Sahar - UNIV ARKANSAS PINE BLUFF
item Stuff, Janice - CNRC
item Lensing, Shelly - ARKANSAS CHILDREN'S HOSP

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 1999
Publication Date: April 15, 2000

Technical Abstract: Individuals' diet and food intake are influenced by many factors including nutrition knowledge, attitudes and demographic characteristics. This study investigated the discriminant validity of a shortened version of CSFII Diet Health Knowledge Survey (DHKS) instrument to differentiate among persons who would be expected to score low or high on knowledge, attitude and behavior tests, based on their age, gender, ethnicity, education and participation in food assistance programs. Individuals with 12+ years of education are expected to have high knowledge, attitude, diet-awareness and behavior scores. Seven scores were calculated: knowledge, attitude, diet-health awareness and four diet behavior scores, including avoidance of fat, meat modification, substitution of low fat and fat frequency questions. The 132 adults in this analysis are from telephone households interviewed as part of a study to determine validity of telephone-interviews to collect dietary intake data. Results showed that the instrument could differentiate on two scores: diet-health awareness differed by education (p<0.02), by race (p<0.0001), and by participation in food assistance program (p<0.002); and fat frequency by program assistance (p<0.05), by gender (p<0.02) and by education (p<0.03). There was marginal differentiation for two other scores: attitude and fat avoidance behavior. The shortened DHKS instrument adequately differentiated on four of the seven scores among adults included in this study.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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