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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Catfish Trematode Bolbophorus Confusus and the Control of Its Intermediate Snail Host Planobella Trivoluus

Author
item Mitchell, Andrew

Submitted to: Annual Eastern Fish Health Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 12, 2000
Publication Date: April 12, 2000
Citation: MITCHELL, A.J. THE CATFISH TREMATODE BOLBOPHORUS CONFUSUS AND THE CONTROL OF ITS INTERMEDIATE SNAIL HOST PLANOBELLA TRIVOLUUS. ANNUAL EASTERN FISH HEALTH WORKSHOP. 2000. p.15.

Technical Abstract: A digenetic trematode, tentatively identified as Bolbophorus confusus, now infects catfish on about 15 farms in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The trematode is vectored by pelicans and rams horn snails and infects muscle tissues of fish. Bolbophorus confusus infections, while usually not serious, have been known to can kill over 90% of the catfish in ponds in less than a week. The trematode is characterized by the presence of lateral pseudosuckers, a clear parasite cyst, interconnecting excretory channels, a tribocytic organ, and two distinct body regions. The length of metacercariae usually ranges from 1 to 2 mm. Various molluscicides were tested against the snails that carry the catfish trematode. Metaldehyde pellets added to the water and Hydrothol? 191, applied as an indefinite water treatment were shown to be ineffective. Niclosamide, also applied as an indefinite treatment, was effective at 0.3 mg/L. In addition, Niclosamide and a copper sulfate/citric acid combination were tested as potential pond shoreline treatments. Only the copper sulfate/citric acid combination applied at 30 and 3 mg/L respectively for 30 min was effective in preliminary tests run in jars. Copper sulfate (4.5 kg) and citric acid (0.45 kg) were then added to about 265 L of water and sprayed into the pond water along the shore line in a 2 m band over 76.25 linear meters. The treatment appeared quite promising, eliminating 86% of the live snails in 96 h while not harming fish in the pond.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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