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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Detection and Isolation of Antifungal Compounds in Strawberry Inhibitory Tocolletotrichum Fragariae

Authors
item Vincent, Armelle - UNIV OF BURGUNDY,FRANCE
item Dayan, Franck
item Maas, John
item Wedge, David

Submitted to: Advances in Strawberry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 7, 1999
Publication Date: December 18, 1999
Citation: VINCENT, A., DAYAN, F.E., MAAS, J.L., WEDGE, D.E. DETECTION AND ISOLATION OF ANTIFUNGAL COMPOUNDS IN STRAWBERRY INHIBITORY TOCOLLETOTRICHUM FRAGARIAE. ADVANCES IN STRAWBERRY RESEARCH. 1999. v.18:28-36.

Interpretive Summary: New approaches to anthracnose disease control are necessary as the effectiveness and availability of commercial fungicides decreases. While the mechanism of anthracnose resistance is unknown, we have evidence that indicates that naturally occurring antifungal compounds are present in leaves of strawberry. Preliminary studies indicate that concentrations of antifungal compounds vary between anthracnose resistant and susceptible cultivars and are present in different amounts in vegetative tissues of different ages. Using leaves of the anthracnose susceptible cultivar Chandler and the anthracnose resistant cultivar Sweet Charlie we were able to separate and identify the presence of three antifungal compounds. Evidence from this study indicates that anthracnose resistance in strawberry may depend on the production and concentration of these naturally occurring antifungal agents.

Technical Abstract: Anthracnose diseases of strawberry are serious problems for fruit and plant production in many areas of the world. The pathogens, Colletotrichum acutatum, C. gloeosporioides and C. fragariae, can occur singly or in combination, and can infect flowers, fruit, leaves, petioles, stolons, and crowns. New approaches to anthracnose disease control are necessary as the effectiveness and availability of commercial fungicides decreases. While the mechanism of anthracnose resistance is unknown, we have evidence that indicates that naturally occurring fungitoxic compounds are present in leaves of strawberry. Preliminary studies indicate that concentrations of fungitoxic compounds vary between anthracnose resistant and susceptible cultivars and are present in different amounts in vegetative tissues of different ages. Using leaves of the anthracnose susceptible cultivar Chandler and the anthracnose resistant cultivar Sweet Charlie we were able to separate and identify the presence of three antifungal compounds. Results from this study indicate that anthracnose resistance in strawberry may depend on the concentration of two normally present antifungal compounds and the elicitation of a third compound in younger leaves. Two constitutive antifungal compounds are exhibited in both 'Chandler' and 'Sweet Charlie' plants but in different quantities. Plants of 'Sweet Charlie' produce approximately 15 times more antifungal activity than do 'Chandler' plants. Fungal growth inhibition associated with extracts from 'Chandler' plants appeared to be temporary. A third compound, detected exclusively in 'Sweet

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