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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Survey of Weeds in Various Crops in Georgia.

Authors
item Webster, Theodore
item Mcdonald, G - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 18, 2001
Publication Date: June 18, 2001
Citation: Webster, T.M., McDonald, G.E. 2001. A survey of weeds in various crops in Georgia. Weed Technology. 15(4):771-790.

Interpretive Summary: Georgia is a large state with many diverse agricultural and climatological areas. It can be difficult to identify the most troublesome weed species in different crops across the various regions. This survey was developed to identify the major weed problems throughout Georgia. This information will be useful to weed scientists in developing relevant research and extension programs to meet the needs of the different regions of Georgia. A survey was sent to each county extension office in the fall of 1998. Respondents were asked to identify the five most troublesome weeds in each of eight crops: corn, cotton, forages and pastures, peanut, small grains, soybean, tobacco, and vegetables. The most troublesome weed averaged over all crops was sicklepod, also the most troublesome weed in cotton and soybean and among the four most troublesome weeds in corn, peanut, tobacco, and vegetables. Sicklepod was found in each of the nine climatological districts and in all of the crops surveyed. Perennial nutsedges were the second most troublesome weeds in Georgia and were the most troublesome weeds in tobacco and vegetables and among the top five most troublesome weeds in corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean. Pigweeds were the third most troublesome weeds averaged over all crops, the second most troublesome weeds in cotton and vegetables and among the top five most troublesome species in corn, soybean, and tobacco. Morningglories were the fourth most troublesome weed species and found in six of the eight surveyed crops. Texas panicum was found in all districts and was the fifth most troublesome weed species. Texas panicum was the most troublesome weed in corn and among the top five most troublesome weeds in peanut, soybean, and tobacco.

Technical Abstract: A survey of county extension agents was conducted in 1998 to determine the most troublesome weeds in eight Georgia crops including corn, cotton, forages, and pastures, peanut, small grains, soybean, tobacco, and vegetables. The most troublesome weed averaged over all crops was sicklepod, also the most troublesome weed in cotton and soybean and among the four most troublesome weeds in corn, peanut, tobacco, and vegetables. Sicklepod was found in each of the nine climatological districts and in all of the crops surveyed. Perennial nutsedges were the second most troublesome weeds in Georgia, the most troublesome weeds in tobacco and vegetables and among the top five most troublesome weeds in corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean. Pigweeds were the third most troublesome weeds averaged over all crops surveyed, were the second most troublesome weeds in cotton and vegetables and among the top five most troublesome species in corn, soybean, and tobacco. Morningglories were the fourth most troublesome weed species and found in six of the eight surveyed crops. Texas panicum was found in all districts and was the fifth most troublesome weed species. Texas panicum was the most troublesome weed in corn and among the top five most troublesome weeds in peanut, soybean, and tobacco. Florida beggarweed was the sixth most troublesome species averaged over all crops, but was the most troublesome weed in peanut, the second most troublesome weed in tobacco, and a top 10 weed species in corn, cotton, soybean, and vegetables. Wild radish, large crabgrass, and tropic croton, and bahiagrass were the seventh through tenth most troublesome weeds.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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