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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparison of Telephone and in-Person 24-Hour Dietary Interviews in a Rural Population

Authors
item Champagne, Catherine - PENNINGTON BIOMED RES CTR
item Stuff, Janice - CNRC
item Zaghloul, Sahar - UN OF AR AT PINE BLUFF
item Connell, Carol - UNIV SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
item Forrester, Ivis - ALCORN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Dawkins, Norma - SOUTHERN UNIV & A&M COL
item Szeto, Kitty - ACHRI
item Sharbaugh, Carolyn - WESTAT
item Bogle, Margaret

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 19, 1999
Publication Date: April 1, 1999

Technical Abstract: Due to isolation, access, and costs associated with in-person interviews in rural settings, Delta NIRI conducted a study to validate telephone interviews as an appropriate methodology for collecting dietary information in the rural Delta of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The design utilized a dual sampling frame. Subjects were recruited from telephone and non-telephone households, and then randomized to receive a dietary intake interview either by telephone (or cellular telephone) or in-person. Food intake information for each subject was obtained by 24-hr recalls using USDA's multiple pass methodology previously applied in national surveys. In all, 409 subjects from three Delta counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi completed the study. Statistical analyses were pairwise comparisons between tow groups at a time on weighted estimates. No significant differences were detected for energy or protein intake between telephone and in-person interviews either in telephone households or in non-telephone households. No significant differences were detected for energy or protein intakes between telephone and non-telephone households controlling for type of interview. Findings persisted when adjusted for gender, age, and BMI. These preliminary data indicate that 24-hr recalls collected by telephone in this rural setting may be as valid as those collected by in-person interviews for energy and protein intakes. Issues related to the generalizability of these findings will be discussed.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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