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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Note on Utilization of Peanut Seed Testa

Authors
item Sobolev, Victor
item Cole, Richard - RETIRED MICROBIOLOGIST

Submitted to: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 19, 2003
Publication Date: January 15, 2004
Citation: --

Interpretive Summary: The purpose of this research was to find approaches to appropriate utilization of peanut testa (skins, seed coat) -- an extremely low value of peanut blanching operations. Several million tons of skins are produced each year. Their commercial value is $12-20 per ton and their limited use is only as a minor component of cattle feed. It was shown that up to 35% of high quality oil can be recovered from the skins. In some cases the oi can be a new potential source of behenic and lignoceric acids that are used in body-building formulations as well as ingredients in making shampoos. After removal of the oil, the skins were useful for making high quality brandy, liqueur, and tea, as well as a source of polyphenolic compounds that may be used in health care products. After use for making tea the defatted, tannin-free peanut skins serve as a protein-enriched product that could find its application in mixed feeds for cattle consumption at higher concentrations without any preliminary processing. A simple technique als was offered to use the skins in finishing decorative panels.

Technical Abstract: Peanut testa (skins, seed coat) are an extremely low value by-product of peanut blanching operations. Several million tons are produced each year. Their commercial value is @12-20 per ton and their limited use is only as a minor component of cattle feed. Research performed to find new uses of peanut skins demonstrated that up to 35% of peanut oil can be recovered from the skins. In some cases the oil can ne a new potential source of behenic and lignoceric acids that are used in body-building formulations as well as ingredients in making shampoos. After removal of the oils the skins were useful for making high quality brandy, liqueur and tea, as well as a source of polyphenolic compounds that may be used in health care products . Peanut skin oil extraction followed by tannin extraction also produces a protein-enriched product that could find its application in mixed feeds for cattle consumption at higher concentrations without any preliminary processing. A simple technique also was offered to use the skins in finishing decorative panels.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014
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