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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Vegetables, Pickling

Author
item Fleming, Henry

Submitted to: Wiley Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology 2nd Edition
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 1999
Publication Date: December 1, 2000
Citation: Fleming, H.P. 2000. Vegetables, pickling. In: Wiley Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology, 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, NY, p. 2427-2433.

Interpretive Summary: Vegetables may be preserved by fermentation, direct acidification, or a combination of these, along with other processing conditions and additives, to yield products that are referred to as pickles. Pasteurization and refrigeration are used to assure stability of certain of these products. This review emphasizes pickling of cucumbers and cabbage, which are major vegetable commodities commercially preserved and consumed in the U.S. and Europe, and kimchi, which is a mixture of fermented vegetables consumed in Korea. Technological aspects of vegetable pickling covered in the review include processing, fermentation, and microbiology; nutritive value; shelf life; safety; and use of starter cultures.

Technical Abstract: Vegetables may be preserved by fermentation, direct acidification, or a combination of these, along with other processing conditions and additives, to yield products that are referred to as pickles. Pasteurization and refrigeration are used to assure stability of certain of these products. This review emphasizes pickling of cucumbers and cabbage, which are major vegetable commodities commercially preserved and consumed in the U.S. and Europe, and kimchi, which is a mixture of fermented vegetables consumed in Korea. Technological aspects of vegetable pickling covered in the review include processing, fermentation, and microbiology; nutritive value; shelf life; safety; and use of starter cultures.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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