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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Alternatives for Methyl Bromide Fumigation of Tobacco Seed Beds, Pepper and Tomato Seedlings.

Authors
item Csinos, A - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Sumner, D - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Mcpherson, R - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Dowler, Clyde
item Johnson, Wiley
item Johnson, Alva

Submitted to: Georgia Vegetable and Small Fruit Conference and Trade Show Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 6, 1999
Publication Date: June 2, 1999
Citation: Csinos, A.S., Sumner, D.R., McPherson, R.M., Dowler, C.C., Johnson, W.C., Johnson, A.W. 1999. Alternatives for methyl bromide fumigation of tobacco seed beds, pepper and tomato seedlings [abstract]. Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association Conference. p. 46-69.

Technical Abstract: The methyl bromide phase-out has been delayed to the year 2005. Alternatives for methyl bromide as a broad-spectrum soil fumigant to control soilborne diseases, nematodes, weeds, and other pests are needed in crop production systems. Combinations of 1,3-dichloropropene and 1,2- dichloropropane (Telone II) + metam sodium, metam sodium + chloropicrin and dmetam sodium + Telone C-17, Telone II, Telone C-17, Telone C-35, and chloropicrin were field tested to control soilborne diseases, nematodes, and weeds in tobacco seed beds, pepper and tomato seedlings. The combination of metam sodium + chloropicrin, Telone C-17, and Telone C-35 were most effective for reducing population densities of fungi in the soil. Most chemical treatments except chloropicrin eliminated Pythium spp. from toothpick cultures placed in the soil. Nematode population densities were low and there were generally no differences among treatments. Weed population densities were low; however, all chemical treatments, except chloropicrin alone were effective in suppression of corn spurrey, cutleaf evening primrose, yellow nutsedge, henbit, and annual sedge. Some of these treatments, with refinement, may prove as alternatives for methyl bromide.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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