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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Animal Nutrition and Waste Management for Beef Cattle

Author
item Cole, Noel

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 2, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The potential effects of beef cattle feeding operations on environmental quality is an area of growing concern to the beef industry. For many years, research has focused on techniques to use the manure produced by feedlots. However, in the past few years the research focus has shifted to development of techniques to alter the quantity and composition of manure produced and to decrease the quantities of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, trace minerals, and other nutrients fed to livestock that subsequently pass to the environment. The predominant loss of nitrogen in cattle feeding operations is via ammonia volatilization from the feedlot surface. Similarly, the predominant losses of carbon are via anaerobic fermentation in surface manure and manure stockpiles. These nutrient losses can be decreased by developing nutritional methods that improve animal efficiency and thus decrease nutrient inputs and subsequent nutrient losses to the environment, and by developing techniques that decrease nutrient losses from feces and urine after it is excreted. This includes decreasing dust emissions and losses from manure stockpiles and composting facilities. To achieve these long-range environmental goals, innovative technologies will need to be developed.

Technical Abstract: The potential effects of beef cattle feeding operations on environmental quality is of growing concern to the beef industry. Losses of feed nitrogen, carbon, phosphorus, trace minerals, and other nutrients to the environment can be decreased through improved animal efficiency, and decreased feed inputs. The predominant loss of nitrogen in cattle feeding operations is via ammonia volatilization from the feedlot surface. Similarly, the predominant losses of carbon are via anaerobic fermentation in surface manure and manure stockpiles. Improved nutritional and management means to decrease nutrient imports and subsequent nutrient losses to the environment and techniques/methods to decrease nutrient losses after feces and urine are excreted need to be developed. This includes decreasing dust emissions and losses from manure stockpiles and composting facilities. To achieve some of these long-range environmental goals, innovative technologies will need to be developed.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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