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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Strategy to Select among Candidate in Situ Sites for Conservation of Grape Genetic Resources

Authors
item Pavek, Diane
item Lamboy, Warren
item Garvey, Edward

Submitted to: American Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2001
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Previously, there has not been any in situ conservation sites within the USDA-ARS-National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS). Ex situ collections provide convenient, rapid access to germplasm, but they are expensive to maintain and do not evolve under natural forces and processes. In situ conservation provides a practical way to complement the ex situ collections, ensuring that evolutionary dynamic forces continue to influence plant adaptation and survival, and meets the need of expanding germplasm collections while working with limited resources. Rock grape (Vitis rupestris Scheele) was chosen for in situ conservation because of its economic importance coupled with prior breeding contributions, known traits, disease resistance, conservation status, and threat of genetic erosion. Using morpholic and life history measurements and molecular (SSR markers) techniques, we assessed the genetic variation present in populations throughout the range of rock grape, a native American grape species. We selected seven in situ conservation sites for mock grape using a strategy based on morphologic and molecular data, taxonomic information, population size and integrity, and landholder commitment. In collaboration with federal and state landholding agencies, we have established the first USDA-ARS-NPGS in situ conservation sites for American wild relatives of a crop.

Technical Abstract: Previously, there has not been any in situ conservation sites within the USDA-ARS-National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS). Economic importance coupled with prior breeding contributions, known traits, disease resistance, conservation status, and threat of genetic erosion led to the selection of rock grape (Vitis rupestris Scheele) for in situ conservation. Using morpholic and life history measurements and molecular (SSR markers) techniques, we assessed the genetic variation present in populations throughout the range of rock grape, a native American grape species. We identified in situ conservation sites for mock grape using a strategy based on morphologic and molecular data, taxonomic information, population size and integrity, and landholder commitment. Using those criteria, we selected seven sites from 19 populations. In collaboration with federal and state landholding agencies, we have established the first USDA-ARS-NPGS in situ c vation sites for American wild relatives of a crop.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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