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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Fatal Cysticercosis by Taenia Crassiceps (Cyclophyllidea: Taeniidae) in a Canine Host

Authors
item Hoberg, Eric
item Ebinger, William - OAKLAND ANL.HOSP,MICHIGAN
item Render, James - MICH ST UNIV, E. LANSING

Submitted to: Journal of Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Taeniid tapeworms typically occur as adults in the intestine of canine and other carnivorous hosts; larvae usually occur in rodents. Infections of larval taeniids in canines are exceptionally rare. We report the first case of cysticercosis attributable to the taeniid, Taenia crassiceps, in an immunocompromised dog (Canis familiaris). The infection, ultimately fatal, was characterized by proliferative development of larval tapeworms that resulted in massive numbers of cysticerci in the lungs, and body cavity of the host. Taenia crassiceps is widespread in boreal North America and like a number of other taeniids constitutes a potential risk as a zoonotic parasite. The immunological status of the host appears to be important in determining the outcome of larval infections for this and other taeniids in atypical hosts.

Technical Abstract: Cysticercosis in a canine (Canis familiaris) host attributable to the taeniid cestode Taenia crassiceps is reported for the first time in North America. Numerous parent and daughter cysticerci occurred in a massive intrapleural and intraperitoneal infection in an immunocompromised host. The largest cysticerci were ovoid to elongate, 5-8 millimeters in maximum length, and armed with 32-34 rostellar hooks in 2 rows; small hooks measured 114-143 micrometers long (mean = 124 micrometers plus or minus 8.2), and large hooks were 156-180 micro millimeters (mean = 163 micrometers plus or minus 7.4). Taenia crassiceps is widespread in boreal North America and, like a number of other taeniids constitutes a potential risk as a zoonotic parasite. Immunological status of the host may be important in determining the outcome of infections for this and other taeniids in atypical hosts.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014